Title

Gender, Womanhood, and the 1915 World Fair

Lead Author Major

Social Science

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jennifer Helgren

Faculty Mentor Department

History

Abstract/Artist Statement

The Panama- Pacific International Exposition of 1915 in San Francisco celebrated the completion of the Panama Canal. The Panama Canal construction followed the rebuilding of San Francisco after the 1906 Earthquake and Fire are seen primarily as a man’s show of domination over nature. The documents researched includes architecture, pictures, sculpture, and commemorative journals. Charles C. Moore’s photo journal is the traditional view of the creator and commander of the Fair. Women’s role at the fair is significant to consider in the works such as the Pioneer Woman sculpture envisioned by Ella Sterling Mighels. Moore gives Problems Women Solved its introduction by thanking them for helping with the fair. The newspaper the Stockton Record is evidence of the propaganda and visual images of the fair as well as mass media during 1915. The Star Maiden sculpture by Alexander Calder is a art piece that idealizes the human body in its display at the Crocker Museum. Dr. Adelaide Brown’s Well Baby Clinic at the exhibition was a visual marker of women's progress. Gender formation was brought out to the public at the Panama- Pacific Exposition. The gender role of women at the time was the beauty of the sculptures, the female as part of the allegory of manifest destiny, the progress of women to be involved in the community and support other women. As the turn of the century witnessed cultural change with the shifting roles of women, the World Fair’s made modern gender roles tangible through imagery and display.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

26-4-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

26-4-2014 4:40 PM

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Apr 26th, 1:00 PM Apr 26th, 4:40 PM

Gender, Womanhood, and the 1915 World Fair

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

The Panama- Pacific International Exposition of 1915 in San Francisco celebrated the completion of the Panama Canal. The Panama Canal construction followed the rebuilding of San Francisco after the 1906 Earthquake and Fire are seen primarily as a man’s show of domination over nature. The documents researched includes architecture, pictures, sculpture, and commemorative journals. Charles C. Moore’s photo journal is the traditional view of the creator and commander of the Fair. Women’s role at the fair is significant to consider in the works such as the Pioneer Woman sculpture envisioned by Ella Sterling Mighels. Moore gives Problems Women Solved its introduction by thanking them for helping with the fair. The newspaper the Stockton Record is evidence of the propaganda and visual images of the fair as well as mass media during 1915. The Star Maiden sculpture by Alexander Calder is a art piece that idealizes the human body in its display at the Crocker Museum. Dr. Adelaide Brown’s Well Baby Clinic at the exhibition was a visual marker of women's progress. Gender formation was brought out to the public at the Panama- Pacific Exposition. The gender role of women at the time was the beauty of the sculptures, the female as part of the allegory of manifest destiny, the progress of women to be involved in the community and support other women. As the turn of the century witnessed cultural change with the shifting roles of women, the World Fair’s made modern gender roles tangible through imagery and display.