Title

Mapping the Sky at 1.420 GHz

Poster Number

18

Lead Author Major

Physics/Applied Math and Engineering Physics

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

James Hetrick

Faculty Mentor Department

Physics

Abstract/Artist Statement

Hydrogen atoms naturally "glow", emitting radio waves at a very specific frequency: 1.4204 GHz. In 2007 students in the Physics Department built a radio telescope (on the roof of Olson Hall) which can detect this radiation. In this project we have attempted to make a map of the sky over Stockton for a 24 hour period, which would look like the sky we would see if our eyes were sensitive to these radio waves. Indeed, our map shows the faint outline of the plane of the galaxy in which we live, the Milky Way.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 12:00 PM

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

Mapping the Sky at 1.420 GHz

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Hydrogen atoms naturally "glow", emitting radio waves at a very specific frequency: 1.4204 GHz. In 2007 students in the Physics Department built a radio telescope (on the roof of Olson Hall) which can detect this radiation. In this project we have attempted to make a map of the sky over Stockton for a 24 hour period, which would look like the sky we would see if our eyes were sensitive to these radio waves. Indeed, our map shows the faint outline of the plane of the galaxy in which we live, the Milky Way.