Title

Comparing Time Out Teaching Strategies: Group Instruction vs. Structured Feedback

Poster Number

11

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Scott Jensen

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

Many programs and families use time out to treat child’s problem behavior. In this study, experimenters compared the effectiveness of group instruction and structured feedback in teaching a time out procedure. Eleven participants were recruited from a 10-week behavioral parent training class offered through the University of the Pacific Psychology Department. Group one participants attended the instructor-led group discussion class in which they watched video vignettes and live lectures, and engaged in role-play practice with no feedback. Group two attended the same class at a different time and were given a 20-minute group instruction on time out and participated in individualized role-plays with the experimenter. Participants were taught the time out skill through role-plays in which an experimenter reenacted their child’s problem behavior and provided immediate and delayed feedback on parents’ integrity. Experimenters faded feedback when participants demonstrated 100% integrity across two role-plays. Integrity was coded on 11 steps of the procedure ranging from proper time out location to redirecting the child to another activity upon time out completion. Experimenters coded each role-play and interobserver agreement was calculated. Results indicated that integrity in group one increased from baseline, but not enough to reach the 80% therapeutic level determined before training started. (Average: 50%; Range: 18-73%). Group two maintained high integrity one week posttraining (Average of 89%; Range: 82-91%). These data suggest that immediate and delayed feedback during role-play practice sessions when teaching a time out procedure is an effective way to increase acquisition and maintenance of a time out procedure.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 12:00 PM

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 12:00 PM

Comparing Time Out Teaching Strategies: Group Instruction vs. Structured Feedback

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Many programs and families use time out to treat child’s problem behavior. In this study, experimenters compared the effectiveness of group instruction and structured feedback in teaching a time out procedure. Eleven participants were recruited from a 10-week behavioral parent training class offered through the University of the Pacific Psychology Department. Group one participants attended the instructor-led group discussion class in which they watched video vignettes and live lectures, and engaged in role-play practice with no feedback. Group two attended the same class at a different time and were given a 20-minute group instruction on time out and participated in individualized role-plays with the experimenter. Participants were taught the time out skill through role-plays in which an experimenter reenacted their child’s problem behavior and provided immediate and delayed feedback on parents’ integrity. Experimenters faded feedback when participants demonstrated 100% integrity across two role-plays. Integrity was coded on 11 steps of the procedure ranging from proper time out location to redirecting the child to another activity upon time out completion. Experimenters coded each role-play and interobserver agreement was calculated. Results indicated that integrity in group one increased from baseline, but not enough to reach the 80% therapeutic level determined before training started. (Average: 50%; Range: 18-73%). Group two maintained high integrity one week posttraining (Average of 89%; Range: 82-91%). These data suggest that immediate and delayed feedback during role-play practice sessions when teaching a time out procedure is an effective way to increase acquisition and maintenance of a time out procedure.