Title

Efficient Sink Positioning Algorithms in Conjunction with Node Recharging Capabilities for Prolonging Network Lifetimes

Lead Author Major

Computer Engineering

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Elizabeth Basha

Faculty Mentor Department

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

This research studies energy efficiency in wireless sensor networks. A Wireless Sensor Network is a group of sensors that collaborate and communicate information about the sensed environment around it wirelessly to one another. A network has a central node called a sink; this sink collects data from the other nodes and sends the information out of the network for processing. Previous research conducted as part of the same project focused on using an unmanned aerial vehicle, or UAV, to power the nodes underneath the bridge. The UAV itself has limited energy, thus only providing a small influx of energy into the system making it vital to use this limited energy in an efficient way to keep the nodes alive as long as possible. This research had three purposes. One, proving that providing even limited energy to the network through a UAV increases the life of the network. Two, determine which node provides maximum lifetime of the network when recharged. Three, what type of sink movement provides optimum energy efficiency. Testing these three purposes: a trial simulated a square network with and without charging; another trial simulated recharging three different ways; and one last trial simulated the five sink movement algorithms while the network was recharged. The results from this research proved that using the UAV did indeed provide maximum network lifetime, charging the lowest powered node kept the network alive the longest and two sink algorithms called Greedy Maximal Residual Energy and Linear Programming Formulation proved to be the best.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

20-4-2013 2:20 PM

End Date

20-4-2013 2:35 PM

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Apr 20th, 2:20 PM Apr 20th, 2:35 PM

Efficient Sink Positioning Algorithms in Conjunction with Node Recharging Capabilities for Prolonging Network Lifetimes

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

This research studies energy efficiency in wireless sensor networks. A Wireless Sensor Network is a group of sensors that collaborate and communicate information about the sensed environment around it wirelessly to one another. A network has a central node called a sink; this sink collects data from the other nodes and sends the information out of the network for processing. Previous research conducted as part of the same project focused on using an unmanned aerial vehicle, or UAV, to power the nodes underneath the bridge. The UAV itself has limited energy, thus only providing a small influx of energy into the system making it vital to use this limited energy in an efficient way to keep the nodes alive as long as possible. This research had three purposes. One, proving that providing even limited energy to the network through a UAV increases the life of the network. Two, determine which node provides maximum lifetime of the network when recharged. Three, what type of sink movement provides optimum energy efficiency. Testing these three purposes: a trial simulated a square network with and without charging; another trial simulated recharging three different ways; and one last trial simulated the five sink movement algorithms while the network was recharged. The results from this research proved that using the UAV did indeed provide maximum network lifetime, charging the lowest powered node kept the network alive the longest and two sink algorithms called Greedy Maximal Residual Energy and Linear Programming Formulation proved to be the best.