Title

Fear in the East: An Exploration of Patriarchy, Misogyny, and Orientalism in Eugène Delacroix’s The Massacre of Scio

Lead Author Major

English

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Merrill Schleier

Faculty Mentor Department

Visual Arts

Abstract/Artist Statement

In this paper, I examine notions of Orientalism, patriarchy, and misogyny in Eugene Delacroix’s painting The Massacre of Scio (1824). The artist employed stereotypes and prejudices to depict the Ottoman Turks and the Greek partisans despite his support of the latter’s cause during the Greek war of independence. Delacroix was, in many ways, a product of his time; The Massacre of Scio represents many French nineteenth century notions of Orientalism and patriarchy. For example, he depicts Greek women and men as the ‘other,’ choosing to represent them as helpless, inferior people. With the assistance of scholar Edward Said’s writing on Orientalism, I will illustrate how this racist, hegemonic model was used by Europeans to create notions of superiority and inferiority, as well as power. With regard to patriarchy and misogyny, I explore the manner in which The Massacre of Scio depicts the stock gender roles women and men fulfilled. I support my observations with Delacroix’s own misogynistic writings to further illuminate his negative views of women, particularly concerning their assumed sexual availability. I also focus on the troubling connection of the Turkish man in The Massacre of Scio, especially his dominance over the nude young woman. Through my research, I draw attention to the necessity of reexamining depictions of the victims of war and other tragedies, which often represent the propagandistic aims of those in power.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

20-4-2013 1:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2013 1:15 PM

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Apr 20th, 1:00 PM Apr 20th, 1:15 PM

Fear in the East: An Exploration of Patriarchy, Misogyny, and Orientalism in Eugène Delacroix’s The Massacre of Scio

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

In this paper, I examine notions of Orientalism, patriarchy, and misogyny in Eugene Delacroix’s painting The Massacre of Scio (1824). The artist employed stereotypes and prejudices to depict the Ottoman Turks and the Greek partisans despite his support of the latter’s cause during the Greek war of independence. Delacroix was, in many ways, a product of his time; The Massacre of Scio represents many French nineteenth century notions of Orientalism and patriarchy. For example, he depicts Greek women and men as the ‘other,’ choosing to represent them as helpless, inferior people. With the assistance of scholar Edward Said’s writing on Orientalism, I will illustrate how this racist, hegemonic model was used by Europeans to create notions of superiority and inferiority, as well as power. With regard to patriarchy and misogyny, I explore the manner in which The Massacre of Scio depicts the stock gender roles women and men fulfilled. I support my observations with Delacroix’s own misogynistic writings to further illuminate his negative views of women, particularly concerning their assumed sexual availability. I also focus on the troubling connection of the Turkish man in The Massacre of Scio, especially his dominance over the nude young woman. Through my research, I draw attention to the necessity of reexamining depictions of the victims of war and other tragedies, which often represent the propagandistic aims of those in power.