Title

From the Land of the Rising Sun to the Land of Opportunity

Lead Author Major

Sociology

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Alison Alkon

Faculty Mentor Department

Sociology

Abstract/Artist Statement

In most parts of the United States, Asian- Americans are the minority. However, in Hawaii, citizens of Asian ancestry make up the majority of the population. This study looks at Japanese immigration into Hawaii and the struggle of the Japanese to go from a stereotyped, marginalized minority group, to the largest portion of Hawaii’s Asian community. Japanese first began immigrating to Hawaii in 1868 due to a work contract agreement orchestrated by Eugene Van Reed, US Consulate. In the years that followed, Japanese came to Hawaii under poor working conditions and false promises. The immigrants came under the pretense that they could make a fortune and return back to their homeland. Some returned to Japan, but many stayed and started a life and families. Through picture brides and marrying settled Hawaii citizens, they established themselves in the islands. Research in texts about Japanese immigration, Hawaii ethno-demographics, and Japanese- Hawaiian culture confirms that the Japanese immigrants faced discrimination in the cane fields under the ruling upper, white, class, as well as other minority groups. Through hard work, cultural values brought with them from Japan, and a changing social and political climate unique to Hawaii, the Japanese broke through racial barriers to become the dominant local racial group in Hawaii.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:50 AM

End Date

20-4-2013 10:05 AM

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Apr 20th, 9:50 AM Apr 20th, 10:05 AM

From the Land of the Rising Sun to the Land of Opportunity

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

In most parts of the United States, Asian- Americans are the minority. However, in Hawaii, citizens of Asian ancestry make up the majority of the population. This study looks at Japanese immigration into Hawaii and the struggle of the Japanese to go from a stereotyped, marginalized minority group, to the largest portion of Hawaii’s Asian community. Japanese first began immigrating to Hawaii in 1868 due to a work contract agreement orchestrated by Eugene Van Reed, US Consulate. In the years that followed, Japanese came to Hawaii under poor working conditions and false promises. The immigrants came under the pretense that they could make a fortune and return back to their homeland. Some returned to Japan, but many stayed and started a life and families. Through picture brides and marrying settled Hawaii citizens, they established themselves in the islands. Research in texts about Japanese immigration, Hawaii ethno-demographics, and Japanese- Hawaiian culture confirms that the Japanese immigrants faced discrimination in the cane fields under the ruling upper, white, class, as well as other minority groups. Through hard work, cultural values brought with them from Japan, and a changing social and political climate unique to Hawaii, the Japanese broke through racial barriers to become the dominant local racial group in Hawaii.