Title

Aqueous Design

Lead Author Major

Studio Art

Format

Senior Art and Design Exhibition

Faculty Mentor Name

Monika Meler

Faculty Mentor Department

Studio Art

Abstract/Artist Statement

For my senior project I did a series of prints that capture my connection with water as a swimmer and as a person growing up in the Pacific Northwest. In the prints I am working with design, decoration, color, and abstraction. They are a combination of relief and monoprints. Water is constantly changing and moving, which is a metaphor for my life as a swimmer and student, to a retired swimmer and graduate.Growing up, I was inspired by the Pacific Northwest Native Americans who have their own visual language of shapes and color to tell stories. Using their aesthetic as inspiration, I wanted to create my own language that would help me tell stories of my own life.I printed on thin, Japanese paper. The thinness of the paper created different effects when held up to the light, but also changed the colors when the layers were created. The multiple layers in these prints and how they react to the light reminds me of how water changes when the light hits it, or when it washes up on shore, and there are designs and layers in the foam, kelp and sand. The colors of the prints are important because they change when laid on top of each other, and that is something I cannot control, but accept. This acceptance mirrors the acknowledgement that water is similarly chaotic and difficult to control.

Location

Reynolds Gallery

Start Date

18-4-2012 6:00 PM

End Date

18-4-2012 8:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 6:00 PM Apr 18th, 8:00 PM

Aqueous Design

Reynolds Gallery

For my senior project I did a series of prints that capture my connection with water as a swimmer and as a person growing up in the Pacific Northwest. In the prints I am working with design, decoration, color, and abstraction. They are a combination of relief and monoprints. Water is constantly changing and moving, which is a metaphor for my life as a swimmer and student, to a retired swimmer and graduate.Growing up, I was inspired by the Pacific Northwest Native Americans who have their own visual language of shapes and color to tell stories. Using their aesthetic as inspiration, I wanted to create my own language that would help me tell stories of my own life.I printed on thin, Japanese paper. The thinness of the paper created different effects when held up to the light, but also changed the colors when the layers were created. The multiple layers in these prints and how they react to the light reminds me of how water changes when the light hits it, or when it washes up on shore, and there are designs and layers in the foam, kelp and sand. The colors of the prints are important because they change when laid on top of each other, and that is something I cannot control, but accept. This acceptance mirrors the acknowledgement that water is similarly chaotic and difficult to control.