Title

Assessment of Islam group threat perceptions and values

Poster Number

14

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Second Author Major

Psychology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Gary Howells

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

Analyses have implicated a strong, negative attitude that Americans have against Muslims (Freyd, 2002 as said in Matthews & Levin, 2012). Matthews and Levin (2012) investigated perceptions of value threat from Muslims by American college students to examine the factors that contribute to discriminatory emotional responses toward Islamists. It has become an increasingly accepted norm that media has a strong influence on its viewers. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to examine how media affects the participants' attitude regarding Islam after they are exposed to a seemingly genuine article that presents Islam either conflicting of aligning with Western values. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two conditions; indicating which article they will be exposed to. They will be given five minutes to read the article, then will be asked to fill out a questionnaire using a 7-point Likert Scale; this will be assessing their perceptions of Muslim value threats. This will be conducted at the University of the Pacific's library or psychology building. We hypothesize that the form of media that depicts contradictory Muslim values, as compared to Western Society, will engender negative attitudinal responses. Conversely, we also hypothesize that the article that depicts Muslim values aligning with Western Society will produce positive attitudes.

Location

Tiger Lounge

Start Date

21-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2012 12:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Assessment of Islam group threat perceptions and values

Tiger Lounge

Analyses have implicated a strong, negative attitude that Americans have against Muslims (Freyd, 2002 as said in Matthews & Levin, 2012). Matthews and Levin (2012) investigated perceptions of value threat from Muslims by American college students to examine the factors that contribute to discriminatory emotional responses toward Islamists. It has become an increasingly accepted norm that media has a strong influence on its viewers. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to examine how media affects the participants' attitude regarding Islam after they are exposed to a seemingly genuine article that presents Islam either conflicting of aligning with Western values. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two conditions; indicating which article they will be exposed to. They will be given five minutes to read the article, then will be asked to fill out a questionnaire using a 7-point Likert Scale; this will be assessing their perceptions of Muslim value threats. This will be conducted at the University of the Pacific's library or psychology building. We hypothesize that the form of media that depicts contradictory Muslim values, as compared to Western Society, will engender negative attitudinal responses. Conversely, we also hypothesize that the article that depicts Muslim values aligning with Western Society will produce positive attitudes.