Title

Gender Differences in Attitudes Towards War

Poster Number

11

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Second Author Major

Psychology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Gary Howells

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

The purpose of this study to evaluate gender differences in attitudes toward war and to determine whether exposure to positive or negative war information affects explicit attitude. Previous research has suggested that women are more willing to participate in peaceful encounters, have more consistent and positive attitudes towards conflict groups (Yablon, 2009). Therefore it is hypothesized that women will hold more consistent and negative views toward war than men. Thirty participants (15 males, 15 females) will be recruited from a small private university. Using a between-subjects design, participant’s attitudes toward war will be measured across two sessions using a 5-point Likert scale, 12- item survey from the Revised Attitudes Towards Violence Scale (2006) in combination with six student designed items. All participants will complete a pre-intervention survey before exposure to either “pro war” or “pro peace” information. In the final session, participants will be given a second but similar survey to determine whether exposure to information regarding war elicited a change in attitude. Implications of this study may suggest gender differences in vulnerability to propaganda and could shed light on national military action over past years. Limitations include small sample size time constraints and experimenter presence may have influenced the responses of participants. Future research could evaluate the relationship between SES or ethnicity and attitudes toward war.

Location

Tiger Lounge

Start Date

21-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2012 12:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Gender Differences in Attitudes Towards War

Tiger Lounge

The purpose of this study to evaluate gender differences in attitudes toward war and to determine whether exposure to positive or negative war information affects explicit attitude. Previous research has suggested that women are more willing to participate in peaceful encounters, have more consistent and positive attitudes towards conflict groups (Yablon, 2009). Therefore it is hypothesized that women will hold more consistent and negative views toward war than men. Thirty participants (15 males, 15 females) will be recruited from a small private university. Using a between-subjects design, participant’s attitudes toward war will be measured across two sessions using a 5-point Likert scale, 12- item survey from the Revised Attitudes Towards Violence Scale (2006) in combination with six student designed items. All participants will complete a pre-intervention survey before exposure to either “pro war” or “pro peace” information. In the final session, participants will be given a second but similar survey to determine whether exposure to information regarding war elicited a change in attitude. Implications of this study may suggest gender differences in vulnerability to propaganda and could shed light on national military action over past years. Limitations include small sample size time constraints and experimenter presence may have influenced the responses of participants. Future research could evaluate the relationship between SES or ethnicity and attitudes toward war.