Title

A Tail of Two Monkeys: Dietary Choice in Relation to Cranial and Dental Evolution in the Red Howler Monkey and Olive Baboon

Poster Number

22

Lead Author Major

Pre-Dentistry, Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Dorothy Dechant

Faculty Mentor Department

Dentistry

Abstract/Artist Statement

Monkeys, along with prosimians, apes and humans, are classified in the Order Primates. Members of this order share certain characteristics while each species exhibits a number of unique traits. The niche parameters of two monkeys, the New World red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus) and the Old World olive baboon (Papio anubis) are compared here, with emphasis on cranial and dental anatomy. Literature searches resulted in comparative information of the ecology, life history, behavior, diet, locomotion and anatomy of these two species. Cranial and dental measurements were taken to describe anatomical differences resulting from adaptation to an arboreal niche with leaf-eating diet (howler monkey) versus a terrestrial niche with omnivorous diet (olive baboon). The data compiled suggests that dietary adaptation to folivory has produced a comparatively smaller, arboreal monkey while adaptation to omnivory has produced a larger, terrestrial monkey.

Location

Grave Covell

Start Date

21-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2012 12:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

A Tail of Two Monkeys: Dietary Choice in Relation to Cranial and Dental Evolution in the Red Howler Monkey and Olive Baboon

Grave Covell

Monkeys, along with prosimians, apes and humans, are classified in the Order Primates. Members of this order share certain characteristics while each species exhibits a number of unique traits. The niche parameters of two monkeys, the New World red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus) and the Old World olive baboon (Papio anubis) are compared here, with emphasis on cranial and dental anatomy. Literature searches resulted in comparative information of the ecology, life history, behavior, diet, locomotion and anatomy of these two species. Cranial and dental measurements were taken to describe anatomical differences resulting from adaptation to an arboreal niche with leaf-eating diet (howler monkey) versus a terrestrial niche with omnivorous diet (olive baboon). The data compiled suggests that dietary adaptation to folivory has produced a comparatively smaller, arboreal monkey while adaptation to omnivory has produced a larger, terrestrial monkey.