Title

The Smart Cane

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

James Eason

Faculty Mentor Department

School of Engineering and Computer Science

Abstract/Artist Statement

Ordinary walking canes are designed to aid a user in detecting objects which are 3-4 feet ahead of them on the ground. This is helpful when it comes to a path which lacks any obstacles above the ground; however, most paths always come equipped with interferences which make it more difficult for a blind patient to maneuver. The client here is one who can very easily run into an object, because their cane could not reach more than the span of 4 feet nor could their cane touch the ground and detect objects simultaneously. The cane designed uses an ultrasonic sensor which detects objects 3 meters in front of the user and 2 feet to the right, left, above and below the sensor. The ultrasonic sensor sends out a “PING” to an object and when an object is detected it returns a signal to the sensor. The reading that the sensor receives will be fed into the program “Basic Stamp 2,” a microcontroller, which will ultimately provide feedback to the user, in the form of a vibration, alerting them that an object is within the allotted distance. The ultrasonic sensor and microcontroller are mounted in the front, under the handle of the cane, stored neatly in a casing, while the vibration motor is placed in the handle itself, allowing the user to feel the alert quickly and efficiently. The cane is then tested on an artificially built pathway, detecting objects 3 meters in front and 2 meter below the sensor.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

30-4-2011 2:00 PM

End Date

30-4-2011 3:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 30th, 2:00 PM Apr 30th, 3:30 PM

The Smart Cane

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Ordinary walking canes are designed to aid a user in detecting objects which are 3-4 feet ahead of them on the ground. This is helpful when it comes to a path which lacks any obstacles above the ground; however, most paths always come equipped with interferences which make it more difficult for a blind patient to maneuver. The client here is one who can very easily run into an object, because their cane could not reach more than the span of 4 feet nor could their cane touch the ground and detect objects simultaneously. The cane designed uses an ultrasonic sensor which detects objects 3 meters in front of the user and 2 feet to the right, left, above and below the sensor. The ultrasonic sensor sends out a “PING” to an object and when an object is detected it returns a signal to the sensor. The reading that the sensor receives will be fed into the program “Basic Stamp 2,” a microcontroller, which will ultimately provide feedback to the user, in the form of a vibration, alerting them that an object is within the allotted distance. The ultrasonic sensor and microcontroller are mounted in the front, under the handle of the cane, stored neatly in a casing, while the vibration motor is placed in the handle itself, allowing the user to feel the alert quickly and efficiently. The cane is then tested on an artificially built pathway, detecting objects 3 meters in front and 2 meter below the sensor.