Title

As Long as You Look Fabulous

Lead Author Major

Visual Arts

Format

Event

Faculty Mentor Name

Merrill Schleier

Faculty Mentor Department

Visual Arts

Abstract/Artist Statement

Faceless figures are placed in a contemporary park setting with characteristic motifs of the Rococo: a cupid statue, a large fountain, and a tall, feathery tree. They are seen at leisure, play, or admiring each other. They wear contemporary attire; however, colors that are associated with masculinity or femininity are playfully switched around between the androgynous figures. Although the figures are arranged specifically, viewers are offered the opportunity them around in order to create new interactions. In addition, viewers are also given the opportunity to record their changes to the composition in a journal accompanying the work. Allowing viewers to interact with the figures sets up a work that creates relaxation, non-confrontation, and most of all, fun. By breaking the barrier of viewing an artwork, viewers too are also simultaneously breaking barriers that revolve around how people perceive gender.I was primarily influenced by the Rococo era. I utilize the warm palette and gestural figures of the Rococo drawings and paintings from well-known artists such as Fragonard and Watteau. I also utilize androgynous characteristics commonly seen in the figures of Matisse’s The Dance (1909). The combination of influences helps to emphasize the main theme of gender ambiguity without disturbing the audience. I break the stereotype of confrontational and sometimes grotesque approaches to conveying contemporary gender issues by welcoming the viewer to the artwork.

Location

Reynolds Art Gallery

Start Date

21-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 9:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 6:00 PM Apr 21st, 9:00 PM

As Long as You Look Fabulous

Reynolds Art Gallery

Faceless figures are placed in a contemporary park setting with characteristic motifs of the Rococo: a cupid statue, a large fountain, and a tall, feathery tree. They are seen at leisure, play, or admiring each other. They wear contemporary attire; however, colors that are associated with masculinity or femininity are playfully switched around between the androgynous figures. Although the figures are arranged specifically, viewers are offered the opportunity them around in order to create new interactions. In addition, viewers are also given the opportunity to record their changes to the composition in a journal accompanying the work. Allowing viewers to interact with the figures sets up a work that creates relaxation, non-confrontation, and most of all, fun. By breaking the barrier of viewing an artwork, viewers too are also simultaneously breaking barriers that revolve around how people perceive gender.I was primarily influenced by the Rococo era. I utilize the warm palette and gestural figures of the Rococo drawings and paintings from well-known artists such as Fragonard and Watteau. I also utilize androgynous characteristics commonly seen in the figures of Matisse’s The Dance (1909). The combination of influences helps to emphasize the main theme of gender ambiguity without disturbing the audience. I break the stereotype of confrontational and sometimes grotesque approaches to conveying contemporary gender issues by welcoming the viewer to the artwork.