Title

Art and Afghanistan

Format

Senior Art and Design Exhibition

Faculty Mentor Name

Jennifer Little

Faculty Mentor Department

Visual Arts

Abstract/Artist Statement

Ascending multiculturalism stands in the way of progress, whatever cultures exist — the inhabitants deserve the freedom to choose to follow said culture or be free of it. Nowhere is this need more noticeable than in the women of Afghanistan. Their notably nonexistent sights and sounds in the global culture are a loss to all. The old adage, “A picture is worth a thousand words” is at play in my decision to document my desires through the contemplative medium of photographic art, alongside my war-torn brother's photojournalism from Afghanistan. The result, I hope, is a stirring of the soul, a provocation to activity. Not only in the actual depictions of tinhe horrid conditions which surround the little girls of Afghanistan, but the long-laden misconceptions we Westerners have had about the mysteries of the East (think provocateurs like Matisse's sexualization of the repressed Muslim woman played by the free white one). I feel a kinship towards all of my sex, and otherwise. I feel for the woman who wore the hijab out of necessity before I did for art's sake. I only ask that you do the same.

Location

Reynolds Art Gallery

Start Date

21-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 9:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 6:00 PM Apr 21st, 9:00 PM

Art and Afghanistan

Reynolds Art Gallery

Ascending multiculturalism stands in the way of progress, whatever cultures exist — the inhabitants deserve the freedom to choose to follow said culture or be free of it. Nowhere is this need more noticeable than in the women of Afghanistan. Their notably nonexistent sights and sounds in the global culture are a loss to all. The old adage, “A picture is worth a thousand words” is at play in my decision to document my desires through the contemplative medium of photographic art, alongside my war-torn brother's photojournalism from Afghanistan. The result, I hope, is a stirring of the soul, a provocation to activity. Not only in the actual depictions of tinhe horrid conditions which surround the little girls of Afghanistan, but the long-laden misconceptions we Westerners have had about the mysteries of the East (think provocateurs like Matisse's sexualization of the repressed Muslim woman played by the free white one). I feel a kinship towards all of my sex, and otherwise. I feel for the woman who wore the hijab out of necessity before I did for art's sake. I only ask that you do the same.