Title

Beyond our Gates: Mobilizing community partnerships to improve physical activity opportunities for at-risk youth

Poster Number

47

Lead Author Major

Sport Pedagogy

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Lara Killick

Faculty Mentor Department

Sport Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Discussions around the health climate of the US have reached unparalleled levels of concern (Time, 2004). Research suggests that while physical activity rates are in decline, obesity and associated health problems such as diabetes, asthma and heart disease are rapidly increasing (WHO, 2000, 2004, 2008a). These observations have led the Surgeon General (2010) to conclude that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic, which threatens the long-term health of our nation. However, studies suggest that the burden of this epidemic is being borne more heavily by particular groups in society, most notably our youth, low income and ethnic minority populations (WHO, 2008b). Our research project contributes to efforts to reverse these trends. We mobilized community partnerships to implement an 8-week after- school physical activity program at a high-need school in Stockton, CA. Our Tiger P.R.I.D.E (physical activity, recreation, inclusion, development & enjoyment) program was designed to improve the attendees' physical activity levels, their cognitive understanding of the importance of leading physically active lives and enjoyment of physical activities. This poster identifies the aims and objectives of Tiger P.R.I.D.E and evaluates the success of the program in providing quality physical activity opportunities for at-risk youth. The authors call for the increased mobilization of community partnerships to produce low- cost, sustainable activity programs in areas where cultural disparities in health are evident.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 8:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 6:00 PM Apr 21st, 8:00 PM

Beyond our Gates: Mobilizing community partnerships to improve physical activity opportunities for at-risk youth

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Discussions around the health climate of the US have reached unparalleled levels of concern (Time, 2004). Research suggests that while physical activity rates are in decline, obesity and associated health problems such as diabetes, asthma and heart disease are rapidly increasing (WHO, 2000, 2004, 2008a). These observations have led the Surgeon General (2010) to conclude that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic, which threatens the long-term health of our nation. However, studies suggest that the burden of this epidemic is being borne more heavily by particular groups in society, most notably our youth, low income and ethnic minority populations (WHO, 2008b). Our research project contributes to efforts to reverse these trends. We mobilized community partnerships to implement an 8-week after- school physical activity program at a high-need school in Stockton, CA. Our Tiger P.R.I.D.E (physical activity, recreation, inclusion, development & enjoyment) program was designed to improve the attendees' physical activity levels, their cognitive understanding of the importance of leading physically active lives and enjoyment of physical activities. This poster identifies the aims and objectives of Tiger P.R.I.D.E and evaluates the success of the program in providing quality physical activity opportunities for at-risk youth. The authors call for the increased mobilization of community partnerships to produce low- cost, sustainable activity programs in areas where cultural disparities in health are evident.