Title

Is Reality Television Becoming Your Reality?

Poster Number

46

Lead Author Major

Sociology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

George Lewis

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

Reality TV is a popular genre deserving sociological investigation. But, to what extent do watching these shows create a change in ones perception of what is “real” and what is not real? Our study explores how alcohol consumption is perceived by those watching Reality TV--does it change the consumption rates (how many alcoholic beverages an individual consumes) because of what they think is, on these shows, “real?” We ask “Does attraction or dislike for Reality TV viewing have any relation to one's reported consumption of alcohol?” Our preliminary findings suggest that there is an increase in alcohol consumption connected to increase in watching Reality TV shows. Subjects responded they did feel that drinking is a good way to meet people and that consuming alcohol is socially acceptable. A small number of respondents themselves as binge drinkers and have also reported a high degree of watching and enjoying Reality TV. The next step includes the correlation of education level, age and employment status to pinpoint how relevant is alcohol consumption with Reality TV, and which show.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 8:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 6:00 PM Apr 21st, 8:00 PM

Is Reality Television Becoming Your Reality?

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Reality TV is a popular genre deserving sociological investigation. But, to what extent do watching these shows create a change in ones perception of what is “real” and what is not real? Our study explores how alcohol consumption is perceived by those watching Reality TV--does it change the consumption rates (how many alcoholic beverages an individual consumes) because of what they think is, on these shows, “real?” We ask “Does attraction or dislike for Reality TV viewing have any relation to one's reported consumption of alcohol?” Our preliminary findings suggest that there is an increase in alcohol consumption connected to increase in watching Reality TV shows. Subjects responded they did feel that drinking is a good way to meet people and that consuming alcohol is socially acceptable. A small number of respondents themselves as binge drinkers and have also reported a high degree of watching and enjoying Reality TV. The next step includes the correlation of education level, age and employment status to pinpoint how relevant is alcohol consumption with Reality TV, and which show.