Title

TigerLeaks

Poster Number

36

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Gary Howells

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

Previous research has indicated that whistle blowers of America are often criticized. (Lindblom, 2007). Information needs to be exposed, but often those who share the information are looked down upon, which can lead to people being fearful of being a whistle blower. (Marcia, Near, & Roach). The current study sought to investigate the effects of school involvement in war activities and students’ willingness to individually participate. Participants were undergraduate students at a small liberal arts university in Northern California. They were confronted with a fabricated statement claiming that their school was paying the military to recruit on their campus using tuition funds. Participants were then asked whether they would sign a petition, being either anonymous or knowing they could face possible consequences. It was predicted that women would be more willing to expose the truth regardless of consequence. Analyses on a set of 113 individuals yielded that our hypothesis was correct, and women were more willing to expose the truth even if they were to face possible repercussions.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 8:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 6:00 PM Apr 21st, 8:00 PM

TigerLeaks

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Previous research has indicated that whistle blowers of America are often criticized. (Lindblom, 2007). Information needs to be exposed, but often those who share the information are looked down upon, which can lead to people being fearful of being a whistle blower. (Marcia, Near, & Roach). The current study sought to investigate the effects of school involvement in war activities and students’ willingness to individually participate. Participants were undergraduate students at a small liberal arts university in Northern California. They were confronted with a fabricated statement claiming that their school was paying the military to recruit on their campus using tuition funds. Participants were then asked whether they would sign a petition, being either anonymous or knowing they could face possible consequences. It was predicted that women would be more willing to expose the truth regardless of consequence. Analyses on a set of 113 individuals yielded that our hypothesis was correct, and women were more willing to expose the truth even if they were to face possible repercussions.