Title

Generating Digital Geologic Maps in GIS from Preexisting Legacy Format Data

Poster Number

30

Lead Author Major

Geology

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Kurtis Burmeister

Faculty Mentor Department

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Legacy format geologic map data from two adjacent areas (Kingston orocline and Rosendale natural cement regions) within the northern Appalachian fold-thrust belt of east-central New York State were recently converted using a new procedure into a digitally georeferenced geodatabase within ARCGIS. The method was developed during the digitization of the Kingston map (printed on paper) and then expanded to aid in the digitization of the Rosendale map (digital vector graphic format). Currently, most published geologic map data are in legacy formats (e.g., paper, digital images, etc.) that cannot be manipulated in GIS. Translating legacy format maps into digital geodatabase formats makes these data available to policy makers that rely on GIS datasets to make informed decisions about social, economic, and environmental policies. The paper Kingston map was scanned and imported into ESRI ARCCATALOG, where it was georeferenced and digitized into a geodatabase. Our geodatabase structure follows a model developed by Sue Priest (USGS) that uses a set of feature classes to efficiently store geologic map data. Linear features (unit contacts, faults, and folds) are digitized first, followed by point features (bedding and foliation attitudes). Polygon feature class data are digitized last, because polygons (areas of geologic unit exposure) can be derived from preexisting linear features. Originally compiled in ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR, the Rosendale map was imported into ARCGIS and used as a basemap for digitizating geologic feature data. Upon successful completion of digitizing both legacy format maps, the maps were then combined into a single geodatabase, thereby creating a single geologic map encompassing both regions.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 8:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 6:00 PM Apr 21st, 8:00 PM

Generating Digital Geologic Maps in GIS from Preexisting Legacy Format Data

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Legacy format geologic map data from two adjacent areas (Kingston orocline and Rosendale natural cement regions) within the northern Appalachian fold-thrust belt of east-central New York State were recently converted using a new procedure into a digitally georeferenced geodatabase within ARCGIS. The method was developed during the digitization of the Kingston map (printed on paper) and then expanded to aid in the digitization of the Rosendale map (digital vector graphic format). Currently, most published geologic map data are in legacy formats (e.g., paper, digital images, etc.) that cannot be manipulated in GIS. Translating legacy format maps into digital geodatabase formats makes these data available to policy makers that rely on GIS datasets to make informed decisions about social, economic, and environmental policies. The paper Kingston map was scanned and imported into ESRI ARCCATALOG, where it was georeferenced and digitized into a geodatabase. Our geodatabase structure follows a model developed by Sue Priest (USGS) that uses a set of feature classes to efficiently store geologic map data. Linear features (unit contacts, faults, and folds) are digitized first, followed by point features (bedding and foliation attitudes). Polygon feature class data are digitized last, because polygons (areas of geologic unit exposure) can be derived from preexisting linear features. Originally compiled in ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR, the Rosendale map was imported into ARCGIS and used as a basemap for digitizating geologic feature data. Upon successful completion of digitizing both legacy format maps, the maps were then combined into a single geodatabase, thereby creating a single geologic map encompassing both regions.