Title

Regulation of Myosin phosphatase by PHI 1

Poster Number

20

Lead Author Major

Pre-Denistry Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Douglas Weiser

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Gastrulation is the rearrangement of cells during embryonic development driven by cell migration. Convergence and extension are two of the driving forces of gastrulation where cells migrate to the dorsal side of the embryo. Many of the same genes involved in controlling this process are also involved in controlling cancer. This is the reason why many scientists take particular interest in the regulatory proteins involved in gastrulation which set up cell patterning. Myosin phosphatase, a complex of Protein phosphatase 1 and the scaffolding protein Mypt1 controls many types of cell movement, including cell migrations and interactions seen in gastrulation. MYpt1 is a highly regulated complex. One of the regulatory mechanisms of this protein that we are particularly interested in is the CPI-17 family which binds to and inhibits the myosin phosphatase. The CPI-17 family is predicted to have emerged at a relatively late stage in evolution because it is expressed in zebrafish and other vertebrates but not in invertebrates. PHI1, one of the CPI-17 homologs is known to contain the PHIN domain unique to the CPI-17 family members. Many studies have led to the discovery of the CPI-17 mechanisms. We know that PHI1 is present in early development and that its over expression can cause a gastrulation defect but not much else is known about this protein. Our focus is on the mechanisms of regulation by PHI1. By isolating the PHI1 gene and subcloning it into vectors for bacterial and mammalian cell expression we can learn more about its biochemistry.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 8:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 21st, 6:00 PM Apr 21st, 8:00 PM

Regulation of Myosin phosphatase by PHI 1

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Gastrulation is the rearrangement of cells during embryonic development driven by cell migration. Convergence and extension are two of the driving forces of gastrulation where cells migrate to the dorsal side of the embryo. Many of the same genes involved in controlling this process are also involved in controlling cancer. This is the reason why many scientists take particular interest in the regulatory proteins involved in gastrulation which set up cell patterning. Myosin phosphatase, a complex of Protein phosphatase 1 and the scaffolding protein Mypt1 controls many types of cell movement, including cell migrations and interactions seen in gastrulation. MYpt1 is a highly regulated complex. One of the regulatory mechanisms of this protein that we are particularly interested in is the CPI-17 family which binds to and inhibits the myosin phosphatase. The CPI-17 family is predicted to have emerged at a relatively late stage in evolution because it is expressed in zebrafish and other vertebrates but not in invertebrates. PHI1, one of the CPI-17 homologs is known to contain the PHIN domain unique to the CPI-17 family members. Many studies have led to the discovery of the CPI-17 mechanisms. We know that PHI1 is present in early development and that its over expression can cause a gastrulation defect but not much else is known about this protein. Our focus is on the mechanisms of regulation by PHI1. By isolating the PHI1 gene and subcloning it into vectors for bacterial and mammalian cell expression we can learn more about its biochemistry.