Title

Frequency range of hearing in African frogs

Poster Number

6

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcos Gridi-Papp

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

While mammals have a chain of three ossicles linked to each eardrum, frogs have a single ossicle with cartilaginous ends. This has been used to explain why frogs can hear only up to ~5 kHz whereas humans can hear up to 22 kHz and other mammals up to 120 kHz. Recent studies, however, revealed two species of Asian frogs that can hear up to 34-38 kHz, demanding a reevaluation of frog hearing. Comparisons with other species could reveal specializations that allow Asian frogs to hear ultrasound, but to date very few species have been examined. Most of the data on eardrum vibrations have been obtained from American and European frogs, therefore, we examined the performance of the ears of an African frog (Leptopelis flavomaculatus), in order to reveal if its hearing resembles that of American frogs, Asian frogs, or neither. As part of a larger study assessing structure and function in several groups of frogs, we are examining the vibration of the eardrums and the neural signaling at the midbrain in response to sound. Our preliminary data indicate that the performance and anatomy of L. flavomaculatus groups it with the low-frequency hearing American and European frogs, as opposed to the Asian frogs. The inclusion of African species in the analysis provides an enlarged pool of variation with which to compare the high- frequency hearing Asian frogs, and it facilitates the identification of specializations in ear design that promote the hearing of ultrasound in frogs.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2011 6:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 8:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 6:00 PM Apr 21st, 8:00 PM

Frequency range of hearing in African frogs

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

While mammals have a chain of three ossicles linked to each eardrum, frogs have a single ossicle with cartilaginous ends. This has been used to explain why frogs can hear only up to ~5 kHz whereas humans can hear up to 22 kHz and other mammals up to 120 kHz. Recent studies, however, revealed two species of Asian frogs that can hear up to 34-38 kHz, demanding a reevaluation of frog hearing. Comparisons with other species could reveal specializations that allow Asian frogs to hear ultrasound, but to date very few species have been examined. Most of the data on eardrum vibrations have been obtained from American and European frogs, therefore, we examined the performance of the ears of an African frog (Leptopelis flavomaculatus), in order to reveal if its hearing resembles that of American frogs, Asian frogs, or neither. As part of a larger study assessing structure and function in several groups of frogs, we are examining the vibration of the eardrums and the neural signaling at the midbrain in response to sound. Our preliminary data indicate that the performance and anatomy of L. flavomaculatus groups it with the low-frequency hearing American and European frogs, as opposed to the Asian frogs. The inclusion of African species in the analysis provides an enlarged pool of variation with which to compare the high- frequency hearing Asian frogs, and it facilitates the identification of specializations in ear design that promote the hearing of ultrasound in frogs.