Title

The Process of Othering: Relations Between Stocktonians and Pacificans

Lead Author Major

Global Studies & Spanish

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Laura Bathurst

Faculty Mentor Department

International Studies

Abstract/Artist Statement

“Othering” is the process by which groups come to see themselves as different from other groups. It typically occurs when a community of individuals negatively evaluates members of another community to support positive evaluation of their own group’s identity in the age-old practice of “us” versus “them”— also called “oppositional identify formation.” This research project investigates the process of othering within the city of Stockton. In particular, I focus on different forms of stigmatization that occur between members of two communities: the University of the Pacific and the city of Stockton, beyond Pacific’s gates. Based on ethnographic research, including participant observation and ethnographic interviews, my research suggests that members of each group tend to notice and speak about particular kinds of differences which distinguish their group from the other, while simultaneously ignoring other kinds of differences that occur within their own group. Further, this selective attention serves to support their feelings of belonging to their own group. In this paper I present evidence that comparisons between the University of Pacific and the city of Stockton are important contributors to the self identities of each.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 215

Start Date

21-4-2011 5:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2011 8:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 5:00 PM Apr 21st, 8:00 PM

The Process of Othering: Relations Between Stocktonians and Pacificans

DeRosa University Center, Room 215

“Othering” is the process by which groups come to see themselves as different from other groups. It typically occurs when a community of individuals negatively evaluates members of another community to support positive evaluation of their own group’s identity in the age-old practice of “us” versus “them”— also called “oppositional identify formation.” This research project investigates the process of othering within the city of Stockton. In particular, I focus on different forms of stigmatization that occur between members of two communities: the University of the Pacific and the city of Stockton, beyond Pacific’s gates. Based on ethnographic research, including participant observation and ethnographic interviews, my research suggests that members of each group tend to notice and speak about particular kinds of differences which distinguish their group from the other, while simultaneously ignoring other kinds of differences that occur within their own group. Further, this selective attention serves to support their feelings of belonging to their own group. In this paper I present evidence that comparisons between the University of Pacific and the city of Stockton are important contributors to the self identities of each.