Title

Fluid Flow Aeration Tank

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Kyle Watson

Faculty Mentor Department

School of Engineering and Computer Science

Abstract/Artist Statement

Fluid mechanics is a fundamental engineering course that engineers of several disciplines are required to take. As mechanical engineers, one can undoubtedly expect the need to work with fluids at some point in their careers. With that, the construction of a unique fountain will lead to a better understanding of some concepts such as fluid flow, specific fluid properties, and buoyancy. Incorporated will be concepts and knowledge from various engineering topics such as mechatronics, mechanics, electric circuits, and computer-aided manufacturing. The complete display is comprised of two tanks. A tall, vertical tank contains a viscous fluid where air bubbles are injected into it through a series of solenoids controlled by a microcontroller. These bubbles coordinate to form letters, numbers, and shapes. A flat, horizontal tank has water continuously flowing through it with air bubbles streaming through it. Magnetic shapes are inside the tank for users to manipulate to observe its particular streamline properties with the reaction from the air bubbles in the fluid.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

30-4-2011 2:00 PM

End Date

30-4-2011 3:30 PM

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Apr 30th, 2:00 PM Apr 30th, 3:30 PM

Fluid Flow Aeration Tank

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Fluid mechanics is a fundamental engineering course that engineers of several disciplines are required to take. As mechanical engineers, one can undoubtedly expect the need to work with fluids at some point in their careers. With that, the construction of a unique fountain will lead to a better understanding of some concepts such as fluid flow, specific fluid properties, and buoyancy. Incorporated will be concepts and knowledge from various engineering topics such as mechatronics, mechanics, electric circuits, and computer-aided manufacturing. The complete display is comprised of two tanks. A tall, vertical tank contains a viscous fluid where air bubbles are injected into it through a series of solenoids controlled by a microcontroller. These bubbles coordinate to form letters, numbers, and shapes. A flat, horizontal tank has water continuously flowing through it with air bubbles streaming through it. Magnetic shapes are inside the tank for users to manipulate to observe its particular streamline properties with the reaction from the air bubbles in the fluid.