Title

Portable Heating And Cooling Testing System

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Abstract/Artist Statement

As consumer electronic devices become ever smaller, heat dissipation in electrical components becomes a larger issue. Many small electronics today, such as cell phones and iPods, have no visible fans or vents to push cool air across the internal electrical components as they heat up during use. This trend requires that engineers be exposed to how circuit components will behave as they are heated beyond normal room temperature. Using small but powerful thermoelectric pads, our device will allow students to test their own electric circuits over a range of temperatures both above and below standard room temperature (4°C – 65°C). The device is powered by a standard wall outlet and a solderless breadboard is provided to use in the construction the circuit Students can visually monitor the circuit's temperature using the display on the device or, with the help of a PC, can log changes in the circuit's temperature versus time. This portable and simple to use device will allow future engineers to have a hands on learning experience with electric circuit components at various temperatures.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

1-5-2010 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2010 3:30 PM

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:30 PM

Portable Heating And Cooling Testing System

School of Engineering & Computer Science

As consumer electronic devices become ever smaller, heat dissipation in electrical components becomes a larger issue. Many small electronics today, such as cell phones and iPods, have no visible fans or vents to push cool air across the internal electrical components as they heat up during use. This trend requires that engineers be exposed to how circuit components will behave as they are heated beyond normal room temperature. Using small but powerful thermoelectric pads, our device will allow students to test their own electric circuits over a range of temperatures both above and below standard room temperature (4°C – 65°C). The device is powered by a standard wall outlet and a solderless breadboard is provided to use in the construction the circuit Students can visually monitor the circuit's temperature using the display on the device or, with the help of a PC, can log changes in the circuit's temperature versus time. This portable and simple to use device will allow future engineers to have a hands on learning experience with electric circuit components at various temperatures.