Title

Spreading the Glove: New Glove May Aid Injured Water Polo Players

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Abstract/Artist Statement

The most commonly encountered acute injuries to the hand and fingers consist of lacerations, dislocations, and fractures of the phalanges and metacarpal bones. Due to the physical nature of the sport of water polo, there is a high chance that these issues may affect water polo players. We created 8 glove prototypes for the prevention of further injury, using a variety of materials. Our current and best design involves the sewing soccer glove spines onto a scuba glove made of neoprene, nylon, and polyurethane leather. This design was tested by a division I NCAA water polo goalie. It was determined that accuracy when passing and range of motion were not affected by the use of the glove. However, the transition from water to air created drag. Dry testing of finger spines was also performed, using table clamps and weights. This test suggested that the finger spines would not break or fracture beyond 45 degrees, the angle at which hyperextension is estimated to occur. Further testing may include the determination of the cyclical fatigue for the glove in terms of the number of passes a water polo goalie performs on average during a game, possibly involving the use of a motor under cycles of flexion and tension. Finally, the strengths of the threads used in the development of the glove may be performed, particularly for areas of the palm and the thumb of the glove. During our presentation, we hope to demonstrate the benefits of the glove for water polo players.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

1-5-2010 2:00 PM

End Date

1-5-2010 3:30 PM

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May 1st, 2:00 PM May 1st, 3:30 PM

Spreading the Glove: New Glove May Aid Injured Water Polo Players

School of Engineering & Computer Science

The most commonly encountered acute injuries to the hand and fingers consist of lacerations, dislocations, and fractures of the phalanges and metacarpal bones. Due to the physical nature of the sport of water polo, there is a high chance that these issues may affect water polo players. We created 8 glove prototypes for the prevention of further injury, using a variety of materials. Our current and best design involves the sewing soccer glove spines onto a scuba glove made of neoprene, nylon, and polyurethane leather. This design was tested by a division I NCAA water polo goalie. It was determined that accuracy when passing and range of motion were not affected by the use of the glove. However, the transition from water to air created drag. Dry testing of finger spines was also performed, using table clamps and weights. This test suggested that the finger spines would not break or fracture beyond 45 degrees, the angle at which hyperextension is estimated to occur. Further testing may include the determination of the cyclical fatigue for the glove in terms of the number of passes a water polo goalie performs on average during a game, possibly involving the use of a motor under cycles of flexion and tension. Finally, the strengths of the threads used in the development of the glove may be performed, particularly for areas of the palm and the thumb of the glove. During our presentation, we hope to demonstrate the benefits of the glove for water polo players.