Title

College Students’ Attitudes Regarding Texting While Driving

Poster Number

18

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Using a handheld cell phone while driving has been shown to be hazardous, often leading to fatal car accidents (Bellinger, Budde, Machida, Richardson, & Berg, 2009). Correlational and statistical evidence support that using a cell phone while driving can impair one’s alertness and ability behind the wheel. There are several states that have already banned all drivers from using cell phones, imposing fines on those who continue to do so. When it comes to sending text messages while driving, teens are a particular risk group considering that the typical U.S. teenager now sends or receives an average of 2,899 text messages per month (Nielsen, 2009). The following study focused on college students’ attitudes regarding texting while driving. Participants were from the University of the Pacific and were randomly assigned to one of three conditions. The first group was shown a video of an accident caused by texting while driving. The second group was shown a neutral video that did not involve texting or driving. The third group was not shown a video. Participants were then given a questionnaire regarding their attitudes about texting and driving. It was hypothesized that participants who were in the first condition would be less accepting of texting while driving.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Start Date

1-5-2010 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2010 12:00 PM

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

College Students’ Attitudes Regarding Texting While Driving

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Using a handheld cell phone while driving has been shown to be hazardous, often leading to fatal car accidents (Bellinger, Budde, Machida, Richardson, & Berg, 2009). Correlational and statistical evidence support that using a cell phone while driving can impair one’s alertness and ability behind the wheel. There are several states that have already banned all drivers from using cell phones, imposing fines on those who continue to do so. When it comes to sending text messages while driving, teens are a particular risk group considering that the typical U.S. teenager now sends or receives an average of 2,899 text messages per month (Nielsen, 2009). The following study focused on college students’ attitudes regarding texting while driving. Participants were from the University of the Pacific and were randomly assigned to one of three conditions. The first group was shown a video of an accident caused by texting while driving. The second group was shown a neutral video that did not involve texting or driving. The third group was not shown a video. Participants were then given a questionnaire regarding their attitudes about texting and driving. It was hypothesized that participants who were in the first condition would be less accepting of texting while driving.