Title

Do Ask, Do Tell! Conforming Tendencies in Attitudes Toward the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Policy in the College Population

Poster Number

13

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Attitude change is a very dynamic phenomenon that has been applied to various sections of psychological research (Hajjar, 2007). In three studies in particular, researchers analyzed attitude change regarding the Don’t Ask, Don’t tell policy (Beklin, 2007; Hajjar,2009; Moradi & Miller, 2009). In each of these studies, the researchers presented their participants with surveys measuring their attitudes on the controversial policy. This study consisted of modified versions of survey questions from the Belkin (2007) and Moradi and Miller (2009) studies, altered to be more applicable to participants of this study. Participants were recruited from psychology courses with an extra credit incentive and throughout the University of the Pacific. Every participant received a packet containing an informed consent and an attitude measuring survey. Participants assigned to the “for” and “against” conditions also received a corresponding list of information that either supports or opposes the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy. The researchers hypothesized that the participants from the two treatment conditions (i.e. for and against) will demonstrate attitudes that correspond to the information presented to them. The researchers expect to find conforming tendencies in the participants’ attitudes toward the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy in the treatment groups.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Start Date

1-5-2010 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2010 12:00 PM

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Do Ask, Do Tell! Conforming Tendencies in Attitudes Toward the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Policy in the College Population

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Attitude change is a very dynamic phenomenon that has been applied to various sections of psychological research (Hajjar, 2007). In three studies in particular, researchers analyzed attitude change regarding the Don’t Ask, Don’t tell policy (Beklin, 2007; Hajjar,2009; Moradi & Miller, 2009). In each of these studies, the researchers presented their participants with surveys measuring their attitudes on the controversial policy. This study consisted of modified versions of survey questions from the Belkin (2007) and Moradi and Miller (2009) studies, altered to be more applicable to participants of this study. Participants were recruited from psychology courses with an extra credit incentive and throughout the University of the Pacific. Every participant received a packet containing an informed consent and an attitude measuring survey. Participants assigned to the “for” and “against” conditions also received a corresponding list of information that either supports or opposes the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy. The researchers hypothesized that the participants from the two treatment conditions (i.e. for and against) will demonstrate attitudes that correspond to the information presented to them. The researchers expect to find conforming tendencies in the participants’ attitudes toward the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy in the treatment groups.