Title

“I Want To Feel You On the Inside”: The Relationship Between Sexually Aggressive Music and Sexual Aggression

Poster Number

10

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

There is a strong relationship between aggression and the frequency of exposure to graphic media and misogynous musical lyrics (e.g., Barongan & Hall, 1995; Daiches, 2004; Fischer & Greitemeyer, 2006; Richmond & Wilson, 2008). Conversely, researchers have investigated how prosocial media, including prosocial musical lyrics have modified the behavior of aggressive children and adolescents (Greitemeyer, 2008; Rickson & Watkins, 2003). Much of the research looking at music and aggression has focused on using rap as the music of interest (Barongan & Hall, 1995; Fischer & Greitemeyer, 2006) although some have looked at heavy metal and contemporary rock (Richmond & Wilson, 2008). The purpose of the current study is to expand the research looking at the relationship between music (industrial music) and aggression (sexual aggression).Participants (n ≥ 60) were gathered from psychology courses and general education courses at a Northern California university. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions, either the sexually explicit song prior to filling out the Aggressive Sexual Inventory (ASI) or listening to a neutral song by the same artist prior to filling out the ASI. We hypothesized that the group that listens to the sexually explicit song will be more likely to express sexually aggressive behavioral attitudes when compared to the group that listens to the neutral song. Statistical analyses (descriptive statistics and independent-samples t-test) looked at the differences between the two groups..

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Start Date

1-5-2010 10:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2010 12:00 PM

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May 1st, 10:00 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

“I Want To Feel You On the Inside”: The Relationship Between Sexually Aggressive Music and Sexual Aggression

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

There is a strong relationship between aggression and the frequency of exposure to graphic media and misogynous musical lyrics (e.g., Barongan & Hall, 1995; Daiches, 2004; Fischer & Greitemeyer, 2006; Richmond & Wilson, 2008). Conversely, researchers have investigated how prosocial media, including prosocial musical lyrics have modified the behavior of aggressive children and adolescents (Greitemeyer, 2008; Rickson & Watkins, 2003). Much of the research looking at music and aggression has focused on using rap as the music of interest (Barongan & Hall, 1995; Fischer & Greitemeyer, 2006) although some have looked at heavy metal and contemporary rock (Richmond & Wilson, 2008). The purpose of the current study is to expand the research looking at the relationship between music (industrial music) and aggression (sexual aggression).Participants (n ≥ 60) were gathered from psychology courses and general education courses at a Northern California university. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions, either the sexually explicit song prior to filling out the Aggressive Sexual Inventory (ASI) or listening to a neutral song by the same artist prior to filling out the ASI. We hypothesized that the group that listens to the sexually explicit song will be more likely to express sexually aggressive behavioral attitudes when compared to the group that listens to the neutral song. Statistical analyses (descriptive statistics and independent-samples t-test) looked at the differences between the two groups..