Title

Structure was Good: A Structuralist Approach to the First Biblical Creation Account

Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

The first biblical account of creation (Genesis 1:1-2:4a) is a highly structured work of ancient literature. Upon reading Genesis chapter 1, any reader quickly notices repeated phrases, such as: “God said,” “let there be,” “and it was so,” and “it was good.” Clearly, the phrases were not placed haphazardly, but are intended to define orderliness and a highly structured creation narrative. The school of Structuralism calls for two foundational methods of studying texts to find more meaning: syntagmatic and paradigmatic. These two approaches yield greater insight into this highly-structured narrative. Albeit, historically, these two dialectical approaches have been employed against each other, this presentation will illustrate the result of both approaches, and then will take a combinatory approach to the two.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211 A/B

Start Date

1-5-2010 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2010 12:00 PM

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Structure was Good: A Structuralist Approach to the First Biblical Creation Account

DeRosa University Center, Room 211 A/B

The first biblical account of creation (Genesis 1:1-2:4a) is a highly structured work of ancient literature. Upon reading Genesis chapter 1, any reader quickly notices repeated phrases, such as: “God said,” “let there be,” “and it was so,” and “it was good.” Clearly, the phrases were not placed haphazardly, but are intended to define orderliness and a highly structured creation narrative. The school of Structuralism calls for two foundational methods of studying texts to find more meaning: syntagmatic and paradigmatic. These two approaches yield greater insight into this highly-structured narrative. Albeit, historically, these two dialectical approaches have been employed against each other, this presentation will illustrate the result of both approaches, and then will take a combinatory approach to the two.