Title

Water Policy, Management, and Development Project Implications: A Case Study in Tanzania of Behavioral Economics on the Perception of Risks Associated with the Consumption of Untreated Water

Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Water is essential to human survival. In 2002, the World Health Organization found that over 1.1 billion people or 17% of the world’s population lack access to improved water sources. As new technologies have allowed for the development of water filtration and sanitation systems in developing countries, it is imperative that we study the effectiveness of these systems and how they are impacting people. This research accounts for different variables that can effect the perception of risks associated with the consumption of untreated water. More importantly this study examines the effect of risk perceptions on behavior towards untreated water consumption. The quantitative and qualitative research is composed of a case study I conducted during August through December 2009, and includes data from the Arusha, Tanzania region at seven different geographic locations in the Arusha district. The qualitative data included ethnographic interviews from the seven selected locations in the Arusha district and then was used to construct a 37 question survey which was then translated into Swahili. The sample size of the data included 300 surveys at all seven locations. Significant correlations between variables connecting different hypotheses were chained together to support the overarching theories. Preliminary results show significant correlations between variables suggesting the value of further analysis of the data using regressions. Research results may offer potential insights for designing more effective water sanitation policy, management, and development projects.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211 A/B

Start Date

1-5-2010 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2010 12:00 PM

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 12:00 PM

Water Policy, Management, and Development Project Implications: A Case Study in Tanzania of Behavioral Economics on the Perception of Risks Associated with the Consumption of Untreated Water

DeRosa University Center, Room 211 A/B

Water is essential to human survival. In 2002, the World Health Organization found that over 1.1 billion people or 17% of the world’s population lack access to improved water sources. As new technologies have allowed for the development of water filtration and sanitation systems in developing countries, it is imperative that we study the effectiveness of these systems and how they are impacting people. This research accounts for different variables that can effect the perception of risks associated with the consumption of untreated water. More importantly this study examines the effect of risk perceptions on behavior towards untreated water consumption. The quantitative and qualitative research is composed of a case study I conducted during August through December 2009, and includes data from the Arusha, Tanzania region at seven different geographic locations in the Arusha district. The qualitative data included ethnographic interviews from the seven selected locations in the Arusha district and then was used to construct a 37 question survey which was then translated into Swahili. The sample size of the data included 300 surveys at all seven locations. Significant correlations between variables connecting different hypotheses were chained together to support the overarching theories. Preliminary results show significant correlations between variables suggesting the value of further analysis of the data using regressions. Research results may offer potential insights for designing more effective water sanitation policy, management, and development projects.