Title

Happily Ever After?The Commercialism of Fairytales and the Shaping of Feminine Identity

Format

Senior Art and Design Exhibition

Abstract/Artist Statement

This installation is based on the deconstruction of feminine identity through fairytales. As young girls, fairytales become a dream world in which they form unrealistic expectations that may not be obtainable as adults. Through these fairytales young girls form an image of themselves as beautiful princesses and damsels in distress; an image that is further perpetuated by society.The principle icon of my installation is a castle form. The large stone castle and soft, flowing, white curtain entrance are to capture the viewer’’s interest and allow them to feel a sense of enchantment and wonder. Upon entering the castle one is immediately transported to another space through an interaction with six photographs, a mirror and soft feminine material. The mylar mirror hangs opposite the doorway and distorts the viewers reflection. The photographs are overlaid with quotes taken from Disney fairytale movies and statistics about women’’s lives. This juxtaposition is designed to confront the viewer with a collision between truth and fantasy. This effect is further heightened by an overlay of sound, periodically taunting the viewer.My artwork is designed to support my experience and my philosophy that women should be strong-willed, intelligent individuals. These characteristics are not supported enough in today’’s world of childhood education and popular culture. Young girls need to be aware of struggles they may face one day. With my work I hope to raise questions in my viewers mind, perhaps even to force them to confront issues that they try to ignore.

Location

Reynolds Gallery

Start Date

27-4-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

16-5-2009 5:00 PM

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Apr 27th, 9:00 AM May 16th, 5:00 PM

Happily Ever After?The Commercialism of Fairytales and the Shaping of Feminine Identity

Reynolds Gallery

This installation is based on the deconstruction of feminine identity through fairytales. As young girls, fairytales become a dream world in which they form unrealistic expectations that may not be obtainable as adults. Through these fairytales young girls form an image of themselves as beautiful princesses and damsels in distress; an image that is further perpetuated by society.The principle icon of my installation is a castle form. The large stone castle and soft, flowing, white curtain entrance are to capture the viewer’’s interest and allow them to feel a sense of enchantment and wonder. Upon entering the castle one is immediately transported to another space through an interaction with six photographs, a mirror and soft feminine material. The mylar mirror hangs opposite the doorway and distorts the viewers reflection. The photographs are overlaid with quotes taken from Disney fairytale movies and statistics about women’’s lives. This juxtaposition is designed to confront the viewer with a collision between truth and fantasy. This effect is further heightened by an overlay of sound, periodically taunting the viewer.My artwork is designed to support my experience and my philosophy that women should be strong-willed, intelligent individuals. These characteristics are not supported enough in today’’s world of childhood education and popular culture. Young girls need to be aware of struggles they may face one day. With my work I hope to raise questions in my viewers mind, perhaps even to force them to confront issues that they try to ignore.