Title

Eva Gonzalèz: Modernity Through a Woman’’s Lens

Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

In contrast to critics who have categorized nineteenth-century French female Impressionist artists as derivative or influenced by their male counterparts, I argue that Spanish-born artist Eva Gonzalès initiated a distinctive vision. Building on art historian Griselda Pollock’’s discoveries of woman artists’’ unique perspective in relation to spatiality, and their reworking of depictions of the female body, I argue that Eva Gonzalès explores modernity through a woman’’s perspective and through the empowered female subjects in her paintings. Her depiction of nineteenth-century female experience is related to Pollock’’s analysis of space: what locations women were permitted, how women artists used formal space in their art, and how the gaze was incorporated into their artwork. Gonzalès captured moments of modernity through a ““woman’’s lens”” in scenes at the millinery shop and at the opera to explore the unique ways a nineteenth-century woman experienced the city. Gonzalès’’s scenes were different from her male contemporaries; her women are assertive, creative, intelligent, and above all, demand a certain respect.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211 A/B

Start Date

2-5-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

2-5-2009 12:30 PM

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May 2nd, 9:00 AM May 2nd, 12:30 PM

Eva Gonzalèz: Modernity Through a Woman’’s Lens

DeRosa University Center, Room 211 A/B

In contrast to critics who have categorized nineteenth-century French female Impressionist artists as derivative or influenced by their male counterparts, I argue that Spanish-born artist Eva Gonzalès initiated a distinctive vision. Building on art historian Griselda Pollock’’s discoveries of woman artists’’ unique perspective in relation to spatiality, and their reworking of depictions of the female body, I argue that Eva Gonzalès explores modernity through a woman’’s perspective and through the empowered female subjects in her paintings. Her depiction of nineteenth-century female experience is related to Pollock’’s analysis of space: what locations women were permitted, how women artists used formal space in their art, and how the gaze was incorporated into their artwork. Gonzalès captured moments of modernity through a ““woman’’s lens”” in scenes at the millinery shop and at the opera to explore the unique ways a nineteenth-century woman experienced the city. Gonzalès’’s scenes were different from her male contemporaries; her women are assertive, creative, intelligent, and above all, demand a certain respect.