Title

Characterization of Serine Proteases in Trichomonas vaginalis

Poster Number

25

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Trichomonas vaginalis, an anaerobic protozoan parasite, causes trichomoniasis the most prevalent non-viral STD. While males are usually asymptomatic, females may have symptoms such as inflammation and vaginal secretions. Trichomoniasis is also a cause of many complications during pregnancy. Infection is treated with metronidazole or tinidazole.However, there is a need to develop alternative chemotherapies because of drug resistance. Serine proteases have been shown to be virulence factors in various parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii and Entamoeba histolytica. T. gondii invasion of host cells has been shown to be blocked by serine protease inhibitors. T. vaginalis has been suspected to have serine protease activity, but this enzyme has not been studied in any detail. We have searched the T. vaginalis genome database and found potential serine protease candidate genes. We have cloned 10 of these genes using PCR with the goal of ultimately expressing these genes for recombinant protein expression. Currently we are also studying the effect of serine protease inhibitors on T. vaginalis growth.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Start Date

2-5-2009 1:00 PM

End Date

2-5-2009 3:00 PM

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May 2nd, 1:00 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Characterization of Serine Proteases in Trichomonas vaginalis

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Trichomonas vaginalis, an anaerobic protozoan parasite, causes trichomoniasis the most prevalent non-viral STD. While males are usually asymptomatic, females may have symptoms such as inflammation and vaginal secretions. Trichomoniasis is also a cause of many complications during pregnancy. Infection is treated with metronidazole or tinidazole.However, there is a need to develop alternative chemotherapies because of drug resistance. Serine proteases have been shown to be virulence factors in various parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii and Entamoeba histolytica. T. gondii invasion of host cells has been shown to be blocked by serine protease inhibitors. T. vaginalis has been suspected to have serine protease activity, but this enzyme has not been studied in any detail. We have searched the T. vaginalis genome database and found potential serine protease candidate genes. We have cloned 10 of these genes using PCR with the goal of ultimately expressing these genes for recombinant protein expression. Currently we are also studying the effect of serine protease inhibitors on T. vaginalis growth.