Title

The Public Perspective On Athletes Who Holdout From Sport Organizations

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Pete Schroeder

Abstract/Artist Statement

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that an athlete's contractual holdout can have on the public's perception on a professional sports organization. A survey was developed that was then administered to a class of approximately I 00 subjects at the University of the Pacific, in Stockton, CA. · The survey consisted of 4 separate scenarios of contractual holdouts by athletes, and ten identical follow-up questions were then asked of each scenario. The questions were based on a 1- 10 scale, with 1 being negative and 10 being positive. The resulting numbers answered per question were then added together, and then summary statistics were tabulated for each scenario. The first scenario, involving an underpaid athlete that goes to another country, had the highest average score, which indicates the biggest positive fan reaction. The least favorable reaction was given to the fourth scenario, where the athlete demands a trade and continues to bad-mouth the team until he gets the trade. A Repeated Measures ANOV A was run to show that a difference between the reaction to each scenario existed, and a multiple t-test showed exactly where the . differences existed.

Location

Wendell Phillips Center, Room 147

Start Date

3-5-2008 9:00 AM

End Date

3-5-2008 12:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 3rd, 9:00 AM May 3rd, 12:30 PM

The Public Perspective On Athletes Who Holdout From Sport Organizations

Wendell Phillips Center, Room 147

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that an athlete's contractual holdout can have on the public's perception on a professional sports organization. A survey was developed that was then administered to a class of approximately I 00 subjects at the University of the Pacific, in Stockton, CA. · The survey consisted of 4 separate scenarios of contractual holdouts by athletes, and ten identical follow-up questions were then asked of each scenario. The questions were based on a 1- 10 scale, with 1 being negative and 10 being positive. The resulting numbers answered per question were then added together, and then summary statistics were tabulated for each scenario. The first scenario, involving an underpaid athlete that goes to another country, had the highest average score, which indicates the biggest positive fan reaction. The least favorable reaction was given to the fourth scenario, where the athlete demands a trade and continues to bad-mouth the team until he gets the trade. A Repeated Measures ANOV A was run to show that a difference between the reaction to each scenario existed, and a multiple t-test showed exactly where the . differences existed.