Title

An Evaluation of the High-P Instruction Sequence With and Without Extinction on Noncompliant Behavior of Children

Poster Number

26

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Matthre Normand

Abstract/Artist Statement

Child noncompliance is a concern in classroom settings, where disruptions may lead to a less effective learning environment and may also interfere with social interactions with teachers, peers, and parents. Recent research has focused on the treatment of noncompliant behavior using a procedure referred to as the high probability instruction sequence (high-p ). During the high-p sequence a series of three instructions with which the child is likely to comply are presented · immediately prior to the target instruction, with which the child is unlikely to comply. The effectiveness of this procedure has been conceptualized using the analogy of behavior momentum, suggesting that once behavior is initiated and reinforced, the behavior tends to persist in the face of a challenge (Nevin, 1996). The purpose of the current study is to determine if increases in compliance can be attributed to the high-p sequence itself, or whether certain components of the procedure are responsible for increasing compliance. The high-p treatment will be compared to the to presentation of preferred stimuli independent of behavior at a similar rate to the presentation during the high-p sequence. Both procedures will also be evaluated with and without extinction components. Our results should help determine which treatment components are necessary for an effective intervention for compliance and will in also provide a basis for evaluating the theory of behavior momentum.

Location

Wendell Phillips Center, 1st floor hallways

Start Date

3-5-2008 1:00 PM

End Date

3-5-2008 3:00 PM

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May 3rd, 1:00 PM May 3rd, 3:00 PM

An Evaluation of the High-P Instruction Sequence With and Without Extinction on Noncompliant Behavior of Children

Wendell Phillips Center, 1st floor hallways

Child noncompliance is a concern in classroom settings, where disruptions may lead to a less effective learning environment and may also interfere with social interactions with teachers, peers, and parents. Recent research has focused on the treatment of noncompliant behavior using a procedure referred to as the high probability instruction sequence (high-p ). During the high-p sequence a series of three instructions with which the child is likely to comply are presented · immediately prior to the target instruction, with which the child is unlikely to comply. The effectiveness of this procedure has been conceptualized using the analogy of behavior momentum, suggesting that once behavior is initiated and reinforced, the behavior tends to persist in the face of a challenge (Nevin, 1996). The purpose of the current study is to determine if increases in compliance can be attributed to the high-p sequence itself, or whether certain components of the procedure are responsible for increasing compliance. The high-p treatment will be compared to the to presentation of preferred stimuli independent of behavior at a similar rate to the presentation during the high-p sequence. Both procedures will also be evaluated with and without extinction components. Our results should help determine which treatment components are necessary for an effective intervention for compliance and will in also provide a basis for evaluating the theory of behavior momentum.