Title

Influence of Public Relations, Media, and Scandals on Fan Interest

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Pete Schroeder

Abstract/Artist Statement

Our study looked to find out if poor public relations have an affect on fan interest in organized sport. The objective was to discover the importance that character plays in sport, so teams do not run into the same situations that have occurred over the last decade. Our study took a convenience sample of approximately 150 people from the University of the Pacific. The age. of the participants were college students aged students. We administered three different surveys, a placebo on fan loyalty, and two scenarios with a public relations disaster. The first scenario was a performance enhancing drug scandal, and the second was a team wide rape case. After gathering out data, we ran repeated measures ANOV A, and multiple dependent !-tests to analyze our data. First we found there was barely a significance in our study at the .05 level. Second, we found that a significant difference existed between our placebo survey and the second scenario regarding a rape case. We concluded that public relations and scandals do have an effect on fan loyalty in certain situations.

Location

Wendell Phillips Center, Room 148

Start Date

3-5-2008 9:00 AM

End Date

3-5-2008 12:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 3rd, 9:00 AM May 3rd, 12:30 PM

Influence of Public Relations, Media, and Scandals on Fan Interest

Wendell Phillips Center, Room 148

Our study looked to find out if poor public relations have an affect on fan interest in organized sport. The objective was to discover the importance that character plays in sport, so teams do not run into the same situations that have occurred over the last decade. Our study took a convenience sample of approximately 150 people from the University of the Pacific. The age. of the participants were college students aged students. We administered three different surveys, a placebo on fan loyalty, and two scenarios with a public relations disaster. The first scenario was a performance enhancing drug scandal, and the second was a team wide rape case. After gathering out data, we ran repeated measures ANOV A, and multiple dependent !-tests to analyze our data. First we found there was barely a significance in our study at the .05 level. Second, we found that a significant difference existed between our placebo survey and the second scenario regarding a rape case. We concluded that public relations and scandals do have an effect on fan loyalty in certain situations.