Title

Comparing the Intuitive Use of Input Devices in Maneuvering through a Virtual Reality System

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Abstract/Artist Statement

Virtual reality has the potential to provide a useful and versatile tool to education and the general public. Through virtual reality, any user can explore an art museum or walk through a foreign city without having to physical go to these places, making these experiences more accessible to the public. However, a constant problem with virtual reality is determining an appropriate user interface to the system: the devices in which the human interacts with the computer. For the general population, a user should not be expected to be extensively trained in order to explore a virtual museum or walk the streets of a virtual city. Rather, the user should just be able to pick up (or put on) the input device and begin exploration with little instruction or practice. This study compares the effectiveness of several user input devices that are reasonably accessible with the purpose of determining which devices are suitable for general population applications of virtual reality systems and environments.

Location

School of Engineering and Computer Sciences

Start Date

5-5-2007 2:00 PM

End Date

5-5-2007 3:30 PM

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May 5th, 2:00 PM May 5th, 3:30 PM

Comparing the Intuitive Use of Input Devices in Maneuvering through a Virtual Reality System

School of Engineering and Computer Sciences

Virtual reality has the potential to provide a useful and versatile tool to education and the general public. Through virtual reality, any user can explore an art museum or walk through a foreign city without having to physical go to these places, making these experiences more accessible to the public. However, a constant problem with virtual reality is determining an appropriate user interface to the system: the devices in which the human interacts with the computer. For the general population, a user should not be expected to be extensively trained in order to explore a virtual museum or walk the streets of a virtual city. Rather, the user should just be able to pick up (or put on) the input device and begin exploration with little instruction or practice. This study compares the effectiveness of several user input devices that are reasonably accessible with the purpose of determining which devices are suitable for general population applications of virtual reality systems and environments.