Title

Physiological Changes Following Intravenous Saline Administration in a Patient with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Poster Number

1

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) have diminished physical working capacity that could be due to low blood volume or abnormal sympathoadrenal activation. Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effect of 1 l/day of 0.9% saline administration in a 38 yr old female with CFS. Methods: Primary outcome measurements were based on cardiopulmonary responses during maximal exercise testing and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). A preliminary exercise test was performed prior to beginning saline administration, then follow-up exercise tests were conducted at 15, 55, 92, 125, 180, 249 and 417 days post first treatment. Results: Measures of peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak), minute ventilation (VE), VO2 at anaerobic threshold (AT), peak workload (WL), heart rate (HR), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) increased during the saline administration: To determine if these improvements were due to increases in fluid volume during saline administration (BIA) was used determined values for total body water, extra cellular water, intracellular water, extra cellular mass (ECM), and body cell mass (BCM) concentrations as well as phase angle following i.v. saline Conclusions: These findings indicate that intravenous saline administration improves physical working capacity and that these improvements may be due to small, but measurable differences in ECW levels.

Location

Callison Hall

Start Date

6-5-2006 10:00 AM

End Date

6-5-2006 12:00 PM

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May 6th, 10:00 AM May 6th, 12:00 PM

Physiological Changes Following Intravenous Saline Administration in a Patient with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Callison Hall

Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) have diminished physical working capacity that could be due to low blood volume or abnormal sympathoadrenal activation. Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effect of 1 l/day of 0.9% saline administration in a 38 yr old female with CFS. Methods: Primary outcome measurements were based on cardiopulmonary responses during maximal exercise testing and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). A preliminary exercise test was performed prior to beginning saline administration, then follow-up exercise tests were conducted at 15, 55, 92, 125, 180, 249 and 417 days post first treatment. Results: Measures of peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak), minute ventilation (VE), VO2 at anaerobic threshold (AT), peak workload (WL), heart rate (HR), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) increased during the saline administration: To determine if these improvements were due to increases in fluid volume during saline administration (BIA) was used determined values for total body water, extra cellular water, intracellular water, extra cellular mass (ECM), and body cell mass (BCM) concentrations as well as phase angle following i.v. saline Conclusions: These findings indicate that intravenous saline administration improves physical working capacity and that these improvements may be due to small, but measurable differences in ECW levels.