Title

Social Influences of Body Image and Smoking

Poster Number

3

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Research suggests that individuals’ perception of their bodies and weight are highly influenced by social factors particularly during adolescent and emerging adulthood stages. Most studies have concentrated on the relationship of body image to smoking in adolescents, and few have examined this relationship in college students. The present study examined the relationship of social influences of body image to smoking among college students. We hypothesized that participants who smoke would score higher on measures of socially-influenced body image (e.g. Have body images that are more influenced by social factors). The effect of smoking status on body image was not statistically significant. Limitations to the study were that a large number of participants were from a community college, older, and not in the emerging adulthood stage of their lives. Future studies should only concentrate on young adults who have moved away from home or living in dormitories.

Location

Callison Hall

Start Date

6-5-2006 10:00 AM

End Date

6-5-2006 12:00 PM

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May 6th, 10:00 AM May 6th, 12:00 PM

Social Influences of Body Image and Smoking

Callison Hall

Research suggests that individuals’ perception of their bodies and weight are highly influenced by social factors particularly during adolescent and emerging adulthood stages. Most studies have concentrated on the relationship of body image to smoking in adolescents, and few have examined this relationship in college students. The present study examined the relationship of social influences of body image to smoking among college students. We hypothesized that participants who smoke would score higher on measures of socially-influenced body image (e.g. Have body images that are more influenced by social factors). The effect of smoking status on body image was not statistically significant. Limitations to the study were that a large number of participants were from a community college, older, and not in the emerging adulthood stage of their lives. Future studies should only concentrate on young adults who have moved away from home or living in dormitories.