Title

The Economics of Violent Resistance in Xinjiang, China

Poster Number

2

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Social and economic development in the western province of Xinjiang is one of the most difficult questions facing China today. Although Xinjiang as a whole has prospered as a result of reform era economic policies, government sponsored colonization and economic directives have largely favored Han Chinese populations, creating a large economic and social disparity between Han and Muslim populations. These disparities in combination with ethno-nationalism and increased international linkages have inspired numerous political resistance groups. These groups have engaged in active opposition to the central government through a variety of methods, including numerous acts of violence, particularly in the 1990s. The following study is dedicated to understanding how incidents of violence in Xinjiang influence Chinese central government spending at the county level, and how those incidents fit into the larger body of work concerning the economic effects of conflict. Empirical analysis of government expenditures at the county level reveals no statistically significant relationship between incidents of violence and government spending, offering a first glimpse into how ideas concerning the economics of conflict play out in the world’s largest country.

Location

Callison Hall

Start Date

6-5-2006 10:00 AM

End Date

6-5-2006 12:00 PM

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May 6th, 10:00 AM May 6th, 12:00 PM

The Economics of Violent Resistance in Xinjiang, China

Callison Hall

Social and economic development in the western province of Xinjiang is one of the most difficult questions facing China today. Although Xinjiang as a whole has prospered as a result of reform era economic policies, government sponsored colonization and economic directives have largely favored Han Chinese populations, creating a large economic and social disparity between Han and Muslim populations. These disparities in combination with ethno-nationalism and increased international linkages have inspired numerous political resistance groups. These groups have engaged in active opposition to the central government through a variety of methods, including numerous acts of violence, particularly in the 1990s. The following study is dedicated to understanding how incidents of violence in Xinjiang influence Chinese central government spending at the county level, and how those incidents fit into the larger body of work concerning the economic effects of conflict. Empirical analysis of government expenditures at the county level reveals no statistically significant relationship between incidents of violence and government spending, offering a first glimpse into how ideas concerning the economics of conflict play out in the world’s largest country.