Title

Improving Pichia Pastoris as a foreign protein expression system

Poster Number

4

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

The yeast Pichia pastoris is used to produce foreign proteins by various academic, commercial, and research organizations. The possibilities of the foreign proteins are numerous and beneficial. Although the yeast is popular to work with, there are several inherent difficulties which can hinder the final production of foreign proteins. The complete P.pastoris genome sequence is expected to be released early 2005. After the genome sequence is released it will provide the knowledge to alter this yeast genetically. Scientists who are improving P.pastoris as a protein production system need to identify the most urgent problem areas in order to know where to apply the genome sequence knowledge to make the yeast become a better host for heterologous expression. We conducted a survey asking various P.pastoris users their major problems working with the yeast and how that problem ranks compared to the others. After the data was collected, we then analyzed and ran various statistical analyses. Based on our findings we have narrowed the areas for future improvement to several common issues. The results will be shared with several research labs that are attempting to genetically engineer P.pastoris into a more user-friendly organism.

Location

Pacific Geosciences Center

Start Date

24-4-2004 9:00 AM

End Date

24-4-2004 5:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 9:00 AM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Improving Pichia Pastoris as a foreign protein expression system

Pacific Geosciences Center

The yeast Pichia pastoris is used to produce foreign proteins by various academic, commercial, and research organizations. The possibilities of the foreign proteins are numerous and beneficial. Although the yeast is popular to work with, there are several inherent difficulties which can hinder the final production of foreign proteins. The complete P.pastoris genome sequence is expected to be released early 2005. After the genome sequence is released it will provide the knowledge to alter this yeast genetically. Scientists who are improving P.pastoris as a protein production system need to identify the most urgent problem areas in order to know where to apply the genome sequence knowledge to make the yeast become a better host for heterologous expression. We conducted a survey asking various P.pastoris users their major problems working with the yeast and how that problem ranks compared to the others. After the data was collected, we then analyzed and ran various statistical analyses. Based on our findings we have narrowed the areas for future improvement to several common issues. The results will be shared with several research labs that are attempting to genetically engineer P.pastoris into a more user-friendly organism.