Title

Effect of child gender, behavioral history, and parenting strategies on strategy ratings

Poster Number

2

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

The effect of child gender, child behavioral history, and parenting strategies on college students’ strategy ratings was studied. Participants included 49 female and 15 male private university students with a mean age of 19.73. Participants read one of four vignettes describing a boy or girl with either a history of acting out or good behavior. Then they completed the Discipline Strategies Questionnaire (DSQ) to measure the participants’ strategy choice including negative, ignoring, rewarding, and talking strategies. There were no significant effects for gender or behavioral history. There was a significant difference between strategies in which rewarding and talking strategies were rated more appropriate than negative and ignoring strategies. There were no significant interactions. The findings suggest that college students do not hold gender stereotypes or behavioral history against children when deciding appropriate parenting strategies

Location

Pacific Geosciences Center

Start Date

24-4-2004 9:00 AM

End Date

24-4-2004 5:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 9:00 AM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Effect of child gender, behavioral history, and parenting strategies on strategy ratings

Pacific Geosciences Center

The effect of child gender, child behavioral history, and parenting strategies on college students’ strategy ratings was studied. Participants included 49 female and 15 male private university students with a mean age of 19.73. Participants read one of four vignettes describing a boy or girl with either a history of acting out or good behavior. Then they completed the Discipline Strategies Questionnaire (DSQ) to measure the participants’ strategy choice including negative, ignoring, rewarding, and talking strategies. There were no significant effects for gender or behavioral history. There was a significant difference between strategies in which rewarding and talking strategies were rated more appropriate than negative and ignoring strategies. There were no significant interactions. The findings suggest that college students do not hold gender stereotypes or behavioral history against children when deciding appropriate parenting strategies