Title

TV news viewing and emotional intelligence.

Poster Number

32

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

A sample of 638 students tests how television news viewing affects individuals' emotional intelligence. It is expected that television news viewing positively correlates with a higher level of emotional intelligence when viewing television news. The rationale behind this is that television news informs the viewers and helps viewers develop a sense of control and a sense of knowing themselves. Some initial results from the study show that there is a significant positive correlation between emotional intelligence and television news viewing. Other types of news consumption such as using internet to seek information, reading newspapers to learn about the nation and the world, and listening to radio for information all have significantly positive correlations with emotional intelligence. It is interesting to see that using chat rooms on the internet to kill time does not have a significant correlation with emotional intelligence. The cross-sectional survey included students from two universities in the central part of California.

Location

Pacific Geosciences Center

Start Date

26-4-2003 9:00 AM

End Date

26-4-2003 5:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 9:00 AM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

TV news viewing and emotional intelligence.

Pacific Geosciences Center

A sample of 638 students tests how television news viewing affects individuals' emotional intelligence. It is expected that television news viewing positively correlates with a higher level of emotional intelligence when viewing television news. The rationale behind this is that television news informs the viewers and helps viewers develop a sense of control and a sense of knowing themselves. Some initial results from the study show that there is a significant positive correlation between emotional intelligence and television news viewing. Other types of news consumption such as using internet to seek information, reading newspapers to learn about the nation and the world, and listening to radio for information all have significantly positive correlations with emotional intelligence. It is interesting to see that using chat rooms on the internet to kill time does not have a significant correlation with emotional intelligence. The cross-sectional survey included students from two universities in the central part of California.