Title

Recruiting students..

Poster Number

27

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

A sample of 700 college students test which method most effectively recruits males and females into school organizations. We collected responses from these students to survey a variety of issues such as gender and individual's behaviors. Many school organizations often wonder how they can effectively reach students and draw their interest to become more involved. To answer this question a survey was given to students at two local colleges. The nonprobability sample was based on the convenience and volunteerism of students from the Spring 2003 Communication 160: Communication Research Methods class. When testing this research question, the survey requested students' gender and for them to choose a method would most effectively recruit them for school organizations. They were given a list of recruitment options. Possible recruitment method choices included recommendations from professors, friends, parents, flyers, presentations, or a choice entitled "other" where students could write another method that was not originally included. My anticipated results are that males will most likely be recruited for a school organization by their professors. However, I anticipate that friends will most likely recruit females for a school organization.

Location

Pacific Geosciences Center

Start Date

26-4-2003 9:00 AM

End Date

26-4-2003 5:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 9:00 AM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

Recruiting students..

Pacific Geosciences Center

A sample of 700 college students test which method most effectively recruits males and females into school organizations. We collected responses from these students to survey a variety of issues such as gender and individual's behaviors. Many school organizations often wonder how they can effectively reach students and draw their interest to become more involved. To answer this question a survey was given to students at two local colleges. The nonprobability sample was based on the convenience and volunteerism of students from the Spring 2003 Communication 160: Communication Research Methods class. When testing this research question, the survey requested students' gender and for them to choose a method would most effectively recruit them for school organizations. They were given a list of recruitment options. Possible recruitment method choices included recommendations from professors, friends, parents, flyers, presentations, or a choice entitled "other" where students could write another method that was not originally included. My anticipated results are that males will most likely be recruited for a school organization by their professors. However, I anticipate that friends will most likely recruit females for a school organization.