Title

Interaction and integration in the mental lexicon.

Poster Number

19

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Currently, there is no agreed upon model for language acquisition that successfully represents the interactive nature of the mind and accounts for the gradual integration of new words into the mental lexicon. This paper unites two models: an interactive model and the Depth of Individual Word Knowledge (DIWK) model. The proposed model is tested through an experiment that seeks to answer two questions: 1) How can links between concepts and words be strengthened? 2) Do some methods result in stronger links than others? Two main hypotheses are proposed in regards to second language (L2) vocabulary: 1) Tactile input will result in increased retention and 2) Decreasing first language (L1) interference will yield increased retention. Results suggest that tactile input is not a major factor in strengthening links; however, limiting L1 interference is much more successful. These results leave much unknown about the role that other types of linkages - such as sensory input and episodic memory - may play in strengthening interaction and integration in the mental lexicon.

Location

Pacific Geosciences Center

Start Date

26-4-2003 9:00 AM

End Date

26-4-2003 5:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 9:00 AM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

Interaction and integration in the mental lexicon.

Pacific Geosciences Center

Currently, there is no agreed upon model for language acquisition that successfully represents the interactive nature of the mind and accounts for the gradual integration of new words into the mental lexicon. This paper unites two models: an interactive model and the Depth of Individual Word Knowledge (DIWK) model. The proposed model is tested through an experiment that seeks to answer two questions: 1) How can links between concepts and words be strengthened? 2) Do some methods result in stronger links than others? Two main hypotheses are proposed in regards to second language (L2) vocabulary: 1) Tactile input will result in increased retention and 2) Decreasing first language (L1) interference will yield increased retention. Results suggest that tactile input is not a major factor in strengthening links; however, limiting L1 interference is much more successful. These results leave much unknown about the role that other types of linkages - such as sensory input and episodic memory - may play in strengthening interaction and integration in the mental lexicon.