Title

The expression of MET 10 gene in Pichia pastoris.

Poster Number

9

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

With its wide range of uses such as human insulin and hepatitis vaccine, Pichia pastoris is a yeast that has been used to synthesized a vast array of vital heterologous proteins. In order to produce a foreign protein, a selectable marker, in this case a met 10, must first be isolated. The MET10 gene is fused to a foreign gene, and is introduced into P. pastoris, which will incorporate the foreign gene into its own DNA genome. For this experiment, a met lo strain, which cannot produce the amino acid methionine because it lacks a functional MET10 gene, will be used as a host. This means that this certain strain cannot live in an environment that has no methionine. In order to place the foreign gene into this host genome, the foreign gene must be fused to the functional MET-10 gene in a plasmid, which is a circular piece of DNA. Afterwards, it can be transformed into our met lo strain, the yeast cell that picks up the foreign gene and the MET10 gene will now he able to live in an environment that lacks methionine. Now we expect that a cell that lives in the absence or memlomne to be able to make a foreign protein. We are genetically engineering yeast strains and plasmids for this MET10 system. Once this has been successfully completed, many new avenues will open and this will allow for the cheaper production of many products pertaining to the pharmaceutical and bioengineering industries.

Location

Pacific Geosciences Center

Start Date

26-4-2003 9:00 AM

End Date

26-4-2003 5:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 9:00 AM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

The expression of MET 10 gene in Pichia pastoris.

Pacific Geosciences Center

With its wide range of uses such as human insulin and hepatitis vaccine, Pichia pastoris is a yeast that has been used to synthesized a vast array of vital heterologous proteins. In order to produce a foreign protein, a selectable marker, in this case a met 10, must first be isolated. The MET10 gene is fused to a foreign gene, and is introduced into P. pastoris, which will incorporate the foreign gene into its own DNA genome. For this experiment, a met lo strain, which cannot produce the amino acid methionine because it lacks a functional MET10 gene, will be used as a host. This means that this certain strain cannot live in an environment that has no methionine. In order to place the foreign gene into this host genome, the foreign gene must be fused to the functional MET-10 gene in a plasmid, which is a circular piece of DNA. Afterwards, it can be transformed into our met lo strain, the yeast cell that picks up the foreign gene and the MET10 gene will now he able to live in an environment that lacks methionine. Now we expect that a cell that lives in the absence or memlomne to be able to make a foreign protein. We are genetically engineering yeast strains and plasmids for this MET10 system. Once this has been successfully completed, many new avenues will open and this will allow for the cheaper production of many products pertaining to the pharmaceutical and bioengineering industries.