Title

An intercultural comparison of aids/hiv and sexual behaviors.

Poster Number

25

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

This study examined any differences between Eastern and Western cultures in terms of AIDSIHIV intervention preferences, AIDSIHIV knowledge, safe sex behaviors, intentions, and beliefs in one's ability to engage in safe sex behaviors (self-efficacy). Participants from Eastern cultures were native to South· East Asia, Indonesia, and India. Participants from Western cultures were native to Australia, America, and Europe. Participants were students attending universities in the city of Melbourne. Participants were asked to fill out several surveys assessing sexual history, AIDSIHIV knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions. Results show that participants from both Eastern and Western cultures received most of their AIDS information from the media and the least amount from AIDS centers. Both cultures also preferred the intervention source to be factual. Both cultures preferred the intervention format to be media, with a personal format close behind media for Eastern cultures. Significant results (alpha level .05) were found for cultural differences on four measures. The mean percentage of correct AIDS knowledge is higher for Western cultures, the mean percentage of safe sex behaviors is higher for Eastern cultures, the mean percentage of both safe sex behavior intentions and belief in one's ability to engage in safe sex behaviors is higher in Western cultures.

Location

DeRosa University Center

Start Date

1-5-2001 9:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2001 5:00 PM

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 5:00 PM

An intercultural comparison of aids/hiv and sexual behaviors.

DeRosa University Center

This study examined any differences between Eastern and Western cultures in terms of AIDSIHIV intervention preferences, AIDSIHIV knowledge, safe sex behaviors, intentions, and beliefs in one's ability to engage in safe sex behaviors (self-efficacy). Participants from Eastern cultures were native to South· East Asia, Indonesia, and India. Participants from Western cultures were native to Australia, America, and Europe. Participants were students attending universities in the city of Melbourne. Participants were asked to fill out several surveys assessing sexual history, AIDSIHIV knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions. Results show that participants from both Eastern and Western cultures received most of their AIDS information from the media and the least amount from AIDS centers. Both cultures also preferred the intervention source to be factual. Both cultures preferred the intervention format to be media, with a personal format close behind media for Eastern cultures. Significant results (alpha level .05) were found for cultural differences on four measures. The mean percentage of correct AIDS knowledge is higher for Western cultures, the mean percentage of safe sex behaviors is higher for Eastern cultures, the mean percentage of both safe sex behavior intentions and belief in one's ability to engage in safe sex behaviors is higher in Western cultures.