University of the Pacific

 

Event Title

Human Memory, Self-Regulation, and Aging

Location

Biology Building, Room 101

Start Date

12-9-2019 6:00 PM

End Date

12-9-2019 7:00 PM

Description

What have you done today that did not use your memory? Memory is not just a recollection of our life stories or answering trivia questions (or taking multiple-choice exams): Memory is learning someone’s name (and perhaps their phone number), reciting a poem or song, retelling a story from the newspaper (or your textbook), and remembering to do tasks we want to do, whether we did them already, and how to do them. Memory is essential and highly valued by adults of all ages. Yet, age-related declines in memory processes are well-documented, leading to anxiety among older adults. However, these declines are not the same for all people or all types of memory. The declines also vary dramatically depending on broader social and motivational contexts. This seminar will focus on broader contexts of memory, specifically self-regulatory factors, or non-ability influences on performance. Successful self-regulation involves maximizing one’s performance by responsively adapting task effort to feedback, to performance self-appraisal, and to careful evaluation of task demands. The over-arching goal of this research is to understand and improve everyday memory in midlife and beyond.

Speaker Bio

Globally we are living longer than ever; in 2030, 1 in 5 U.S. residents will be retirement age. Dr. Strickland-Hughes’s professional passion is asking how can we live longer, better? She is a developmental psychologist trained in experimental and intervention research methodologies. She completed her B.S. in Finance at North Carolina State University (2011) and her M.S. (2014) and Ph.D. (2017) in Psychology, with a certificate in Gerontology, at the University of Florida. After graduation, she joined the University of the Pacific community as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Director of the Aging and Cognitive Training Laboratory. Her research, conducted with assistance from Pacific undergraduate students, has been presented at international conferences and published in flagship journals including The Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and Psychology of Aging.

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Sep 12th, 6:00 PM Sep 12th, 7:00 PM

Human Memory, Self-Regulation, and Aging

Biology Building, Room 101

What have you done today that did not use your memory? Memory is not just a recollection of our life stories or answering trivia questions (or taking multiple-choice exams): Memory is learning someone’s name (and perhaps their phone number), reciting a poem or song, retelling a story from the newspaper (or your textbook), and remembering to do tasks we want to do, whether we did them already, and how to do them. Memory is essential and highly valued by adults of all ages. Yet, age-related declines in memory processes are well-documented, leading to anxiety among older adults. However, these declines are not the same for all people or all types of memory. The declines also vary dramatically depending on broader social and motivational contexts. This seminar will focus on broader contexts of memory, specifically self-regulatory factors, or non-ability influences on performance. Successful self-regulation involves maximizing one’s performance by responsively adapting task effort to feedback, to performance self-appraisal, and to careful evaluation of task demands. The over-arching goal of this research is to understand and improve everyday memory in midlife and beyond.