University of the Pacific

 

Event Title

The Never-Ending Story of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

Location

Biology Building, Room 101

Start Date

22-2-2018 6:00 PM

End Date

22-2-2018 7:00 PM

Description

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a ligand-activated signaling molecule with diverse biological functions ranging from regulation of enzymes for drug metabolism to modulation of immune response. It also plays a role in cell growth which may affect many types of cancer. My laboratory has been studying the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor for two decades now at Pacific and our study primarily focuses on how this protein interacts with other proteins and DNA. Essentially we are trying to understand how this receptor works at the molecular level with the hope of designing drugs rationally to modulate the function of this protein for disease treatment. This seminar will provide some highlights and our findings of this receptor.

Speaker Bio

Pro fessor Chan received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from UCSF and continued on with his study at UCSF to obtain a Ph.D. degree in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, studying the active site structure of cytochrome P4504A1, a drug metabolizing enzyme. He then went on to study another drug metabolizing enzyme – epoxide hydrolase – at UC Davis as a postdoctoral researcher for a year, followed by a four - year postdoc at Northwestern University Medical School, where he began his study of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. In 1 996, he became an assistant professor at the Pacific Pharmacy School. He has been studying the aryl hydrocarbon receptor ever since with the support from the National Institutes of Health.

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Feb 22nd, 6:00 PM Feb 22nd, 7:00 PM

The Never-Ending Story of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

Biology Building, Room 101

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a ligand-activated signaling molecule with diverse biological functions ranging from regulation of enzymes for drug metabolism to modulation of immune response. It also plays a role in cell growth which may affect many types of cancer. My laboratory has been studying the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor for two decades now at Pacific and our study primarily focuses on how this protein interacts with other proteins and DNA. Essentially we are trying to understand how this receptor works at the molecular level with the hope of designing drugs rationally to modulate the function of this protein for disease treatment. This seminar will provide some highlights and our findings of this receptor.