University of the Pacific

 

Event Title

Empowering Therapeutic Peptides by Enhancing its in vivo Half-Life

Location

Biology Building, Room 101

Start Date

1-3-2015 6:00 PM

End Date

1-3-2015 7:00 PM

Description

The tremendous therapeutic potential of peptides has not been fulfilled and potential peptide therapies that have failed far outnumber the successes so far. A major challenge impeding the more widespread use of peptides as therapeutics is their poor pharmaco­kinetic profile, due to short in vivo half-life. Therefore, ex­tending the in vivo half-life of peptides is clearly desirable in order for their therapeutic potential to be realized, without the need for high doses and frequent administration. Our group is developing a novel strategy that will enhance the pharmacokinetic properties of thera­peutic peptides, which could decrease dosing frequency and im­prove patient convenience and compliance.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Alhamadsheh is an assistant professor in the School of Pharmacy at Pacific. He received his PhD in Organic Chemistry from the Univer­sity of Toledo and did his postdoctoral studies in Chemical Biology at Stanford University and Portland State University. His research group employs an interdisciplinary approach to studying protein-protein interac­tions (PPIs), combining organic chemistry with biochemistry and molecular biology. Dr. Alhamdsheh's group is particularly inter­ested in developing chemical tools and therapeutic agents for protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Transthyretin Amyloidosis. Dr. Alhamadsheh is a recipient of New Investigator Award from AACP. He has co-authored three patents and 17 articles in peer-reviewed journals.

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Mar 1st, 6:00 PM Mar 1st, 7:00 PM

Empowering Therapeutic Peptides by Enhancing its in vivo Half-Life

Biology Building, Room 101

The tremendous therapeutic potential of peptides has not been fulfilled and potential peptide therapies that have failed far outnumber the successes so far. A major challenge impeding the more widespread use of peptides as therapeutics is their poor pharmaco­kinetic profile, due to short in vivo half-life. Therefore, ex­tending the in vivo half-life of peptides is clearly desirable in order for their therapeutic potential to be realized, without the need for high doses and frequent administration. Our group is developing a novel strategy that will enhance the pharmacokinetic properties of thera­peutic peptides, which could decrease dosing frequency and im­prove patient convenience and compliance.