Lead Author Affiliation

Dental Hygiene

Lead Author Program & Year

Dental Hygiene

Presentation Category

Research

Introduction/Context/Diagnosis

Periodontal disease is complex, multifactorial, and polymicrobial infections that lead to inflammation of the periodontium. Left untreated the chronic inflammation could lead to loss of tissue attachment, bone loss and eventually tooth loss (Castro et al., 2019). Because the antioxidants in green tea have been known for its health promoting benefits, the goal of this study is to determine if green tea can be used as adjunctive therapy for patients with periodontal disease. A PICO question was devised to guide the research as follows: For a population of patients with periodontal disease, does antioxidants from green tea serve as good adjuvant as compared to standard periodontal therapy in treating or preventing the progression of periodontal disease? Overall, the antioxidants in green tea serve as a good adjuvant in treating patients with periodontal disease. However, due to the heterogeneity in the data and small sample sizes from all the studies conducted on this topic, this conclusion must be viewed with caution. Therefore, more randomized control studies with large sample sizes are needed to further validate this to be considered the gold standard of care in non-surgical periodontal treatment.

Methods/Treatment Plan

To determine whether patients with periodontal disease undergoing adjunctive therapy with antioxidants from green tea as compared to standard periodontal therapy will lead to better prognosis by way of literature review through PubMed and Google Scholar.

Results/Outcome

The antioxidants from green tea can be used as an adjunctive therapy in treating patients with periodontal disease. Daily consumption of green tea herbals after periodontal treatment can help reduce bleeding and improve probing pocket depth index. Strip or gel containing catechins can help with the healing process by reducing bleeding on probing and gingival inflammation. The antioxidants containing strip is a good alternative to using antibiotics to treat patients undergoing periodontal therapy due to the concern of microbial resistance, gastrointestinal intolerance and microbiome alterations. In addition, green tea-based mouthwashes are as effective as chlorhexidine in treating patients with periodontitis, which serves as a good alternative when side effects due to the long-term usage of chlorhexidine may cause patients’ restorative materials to discolor, as well as oral dryness, soreness and taste perturbation. However, due to the heterogeneity in the data and small sample sizes from all the studies conducted on this topic, this conclusion must be viewed with caution. As such, more randomized control studies with large sample sizes are needed to validate these findings for it to be considered the standard of care in non-surgical periodontal therapy.

Significance/Conclusions

N/A

Format

Event

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Green Tea and Periodontal Health: A Literature Review

Periodontal disease is complex, multifactorial, and polymicrobial infections that lead to inflammation of the periodontium. Left untreated the chronic inflammation could lead to loss of tissue attachment, bone loss and eventually tooth loss (Castro et al., 2019). Because the antioxidants in green tea have been known for its health promoting benefits, the goal of this study is to determine if green tea can be used as adjunctive therapy for patients with periodontal disease. A PICO question was devised to guide the research as follows: For a population of patients with periodontal disease, does antioxidants from green tea serve as good adjuvant as compared to standard periodontal therapy in treating or preventing the progression of periodontal disease? Overall, the antioxidants in green tea serve as a good adjuvant in treating patients with periodontal disease. However, due to the heterogeneity in the data and small sample sizes from all the studies conducted on this topic, this conclusion must be viewed with caution. Therefore, more randomized control studies with large sample sizes are needed to further validate this to be considered the gold standard of care in non-surgical periodontal treatment.