Title

Physiological Variables to Detect Training Distress in Collegiate Soccer Players

ORCID

J. Mark VanNess: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5902-8735

Document Type

Article

Publication Title

Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

Department

Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences Department

ISSN

0195-9131

Volume

49

Issue

5S

DOI

10.1249/01.mss.0000518484.54512.4e

First Page

571

Publication Date

6-1-2017

Abstract

Non-invasive and measurable techniques to identify training distress may be useful to adjust training volume. Traditionally, questionnaire data examining psychological domains have been relied on to detect training distress. PURPOSE: To examine running performance (shuttle run), resting heart rate, and heart rate recovery throughout a soccer season to determine if these physiological parameters can be used to detect training distress in collegiate soccer players. METHODS: 26 women and 17 men were enrolled in the study. Data were collected at four time points throughout the season: beginning, two during the season, and during post-season play. The data were: shuttle run time, heart rate recovery time, resting heart rate values, and multicomponent training distress score (MTDS) questionnaire. All variables were collected at each time point. Multivariate analyses were performed with the dependent variable, with time, grade in school, and gender as independent variable. RESULTS: Shuttle run times were prolonged in the beginning and end of season compared to the two mid-season tests (p<0.001); heart rate recovery improved throughout the season (p=0.003); freshmen deviation from baseline MTDS was greater compared to all other grades (p=0.001). Although not statistically significant, resting heart rate values trended up at the end of the season for both genders. MTDS correlated most with shuttle run time and resting heart rate. CONCLUSIONS: Shuttle run time and resting heart rate appear to be possible variables that could serve as physiological measurements for training distress, although it appears higher physical fitness serves as a protective effect against training distress.

Comments

2017 ACSM National Conference, June 1, Denver, CO

Share

COinS